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Posts Tagged ‘youtube


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In the video, John Green shared the general rules on using the prepositions on, in, and at.

This was useful to me partly because I was just asked that question last week during my research writing consultation. Now I have an answer for the next session.

The video was also useful in a broader sense. With just about every rule comes exceptions, and grammar is no exception.

I would challenge anyone attempting to standardise “pedagogy” or “learning” in schooling and education. When implemented, they will find exceptions to the model answer, ideal formula, or prescribed standard.

So are standards or definitions pointless then? No, they are baselines from which variations sprout. We just need to be critical enough to recognise what is valuable or erroneous, helpful or harmful, and relevant or not, depending on the context.


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I wonder how many schools might start their academic years by showing the video above, generating discussion among teachers, and setting goals.

The movie has an agenda about being too liberal with alternative mathematics and facts. However, that does not mean that it is the only point of view.

After all, different people on different sides of any argument can suffer from the same affliction — being overly dogmatic.


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In the first part of this SciShow video, Hank Green outlined a study that examined the link between social media use and ADHD symptoms.

Bottomline: No study is perfect and this one suffered from a reliance on self-reported data, reporting symptoms without prior baseline diagnoses, and correlational outcomes.

The last point was key. Green pointed out that the study could not prove that social media caused ADHD symptoms any more than the tendency of users with ADHD checking social media frequently. In his own words:

Using this study to say that smartphones and social media cause ADHD would be like looking at ER data and concluding that firefighters cause burn injuries.


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I enjoy Matt Pat’s video essays because he puts a lot of work into them. The fact that they are easy to digest belies the complexity of their content.

In this latest instalment, he used the recent (and frankly overdone) examples of Yanni/Laurel and Brainstorm/Green Needle to illustrate how subjective our perceptions can be.

At the very least, we should take away these concepts: Our senses are easy to fool and what we perceive is not the same across the board. These are fundamental concepts in rigorous teacher education programmes. And yet we try to school students with singular approaches or adhere blindly to standards.


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This SciShow Psych video explains why we seem to forget where we put things. We do not register events that are mundane and when we operate on autopilot.

The video is also a reminder that our brains are designed to forget. It takes conscious effort to first pay attention and then to try to remember. So if we try to understand the learner and learning, we might do better as a teacher while teaching.

The top two winners of the recently concluded Britain’s Got Talent have what some might label disabilities.

These were the final results.

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And here were their performances during the finals.

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So, remind me — what makes someone disabled again? Do we focus on disability or this ability?


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What is said has impact. What gets done after what is said can also have an impact.

But there is far too much rhetoric and not enough timely action.


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