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Posts Tagged ‘videos

I put three seemingly unrelated videos in one of my private YouTube playlists for watching or use later.

The first was about chocolate. The second about non-digital special effects. The third was about an autistic man. While they seem unrelated, they are linked to what and how I watch on YouTube.


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I watch SciShow religiously — I also subscribe to their podcast — so the first video is not surprising. This video feeds my need for nuanced views and to correct misconceptions.

The second might have appeared on my feed when I searched for current examples of augmented and virtual reality for a Masters course I am currently facilitating. This video appeared in my feed after that session was over and it was about neither AR nor VR, but it emphasised the importance of tactile manipulation in learning. It is something I can use in the closing session to highlight contextual use.

The third was a welcome surprise since I also facilitate a short course on ICT for inclusive education. The course stopped for a while as administrators worked out funding issues, but now that it is back I am glad to have another possible resource to spark discussion.
 

 
The link between these videos was how YouTube algorithms learnt my preferences and habits. While such algorithms are design to serve up videos and ads that might be relevant to me, it does not always do this well.

The ads are driven by more than personalisation. There is the brute force push and sell of products and services that have no relevance to me, e.g., how to be a Carousell or Amazon top seller. Those algorithms, if they apply at all, do not have my interest in mind.

The recommended videos are better. I help the algorithms out by occasionally deactivating my watch and search history. I might also use an incognito browser window. I do this to prevent the algorithms from thinking that I am interested in something new.

I also visit my watch history and delete videos listings that might misinform YouTube’s algorithms. This also helps me receive more relevant content.

The lesson is about taking control of your feeds. Do this and your feeds provide you with relevant content and serendipitous surprises. Don’t do this and you become a pawn in someone else’s game.

The FBE YouTube channel released a video about the preponderance of “Florida man”.

For the uninitiated, “Florida man” is a frequent prefix that appears in ridiculous newspaper headline or news chyrons. The video below provides numerous examples.


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While entertaining, the video is also an example of exploring nuance.

When trying to answer the question “Why does Florida seem to have so many crazy people?” it might be tempting to assume that there is something in the air or water there that makes people crazy.

The crazy thing is that a tongue-firmly-in-cheek report actually reveals the root of Florida man. This is the segment that matters.


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There is a law in the state of Florida in the USA that requires governing bodies (the police in this case) to provide access of records to the public (news agencies, for example.)

So there is something in Florida that makes Florida man so ”common” — it is the law that requires the sharing of information. There are not necessarily more crazy people there. There is more open reporting of crazy people.

This is a simple example of nuance. It is going beyond anecdotes and assumptions. It is about digging deeper and making connections.

This week’s Crash Course’s video on navigating digital information focused on evaluating images and videos.


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Host John Green provided examples of how images could be used to represent and misrepresent both context and context. If it is easy to fool someone with text, it is even easier with images.

When presented with any image we might verify its context and content by a) seeking its source and determining its reliability, and b) searching laterally for its validity. If links or cues are not available in a suspicious image, we might use Google’s image search or Tineye to evaluate its worth.

How about videos? The principles are the same: Determine the veracity of its source, the reputation of its creator(s), and whether or not is was altered. It might be difficult to do the last item nowadays, but difficult is not impossible. What works for text also works for videos — search, read, and watch laterally.

One thing I do to sense changes in my field is watch relevant YouTube videos. YouTube’s algorithms take note of what I am interested in and recommend similar videos.

For example, in 2017 I watched and archived in a playlist this video about how an engineer explained virtual reality (VT) to learners at five different levels.


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Last week, YouTube recommended the video below to me.


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Not only was this one way of staying current with technological trends in education and training, it was also a useful resource for a Masters course I will be facilitating soon.

Some folks like to complain about much current technologies seem to know about us. They might forget that strategically letting some information go can be a good thing.

Mention Harvard and several things might come to mind: Ivy League, crème de la crème, high fees, and more.

But how about Bohemian Rhapsody? Here is Queen performing it.


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Even The Muppets have their take on this iconic piece.


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But so does THUD — The Harvard Undergraduate Drummers.


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The video above is their rendition of Bohemian Rhapsody with plastic pipes.

Some might wonder how this justifies the high cost of going to Harvard. If they do, they are missing the point. This is part of their education and the type that actually matters. It is the application of creative thought. It is cooperation where the sum is more than the combination of its parts, i.e., true collaboration.

If you do not get that, you need an education. Perhaps not at Harvard. These YouTube videos are a good start.

The videos below illustrate a product and a bit of insight into processes that led to the product.


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I like harping on seeing the processes and behind the product.

Why? Schooling still focuses too much on the products of learning and not enough on the processes.

Why? The products are easier to see and assess; the processes are less tangible and difficult to evaluate. And yet, the processes are what last and are thus more important.

The top two winners of the recently concluded Britain’s Got Talent have what some might label disabilities.

These were the final results.

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And here were their performances during the finals.

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So, remind me — what makes someone disabled again? Do we focus on disability or this ability?


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