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Posts Tagged ‘videos

This week’s Crash Course’s video on navigating digital information focused on evaluating images and videos.


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Host John Green provided examples of how images could be used to represent and misrepresent both context and context. If it is easy to fool someone with text, it is even easier with images.

When presented with any image we might verify its context and content by a) seeking its source and determining its reliability, and b) searching laterally for its validity. If links or cues are not available in a suspicious image, we might use Google’s image search or Tineye to evaluate its worth.

How about videos? The principles are the same: Determine the veracity of its source, the reputation of its creator(s), and whether or not is was altered. It might be difficult to do the last item nowadays, but difficult is not impossible. What works for text also works for videos — search, read, and watch laterally.

One thing I do to sense changes in my field is watch relevant YouTube videos. YouTube’s algorithms take note of what I am interested in and recommend similar videos.

For example, in 2017 I watched and archived in a playlist this video about how an engineer explained virtual reality (VT) to learners at five different levels.


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Last week, YouTube recommended the video below to me.


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Not only was this one way of staying current with technological trends in education and training, it was also a useful resource for a Masters course I will be facilitating soon.

Some folks like to complain about much current technologies seem to know about us. They might forget that strategically letting some information go can be a good thing.

Mention Harvard and several things might come to mind: Ivy League, crème de la crème, high fees, and more.

But how about Bohemian Rhapsody? Here is Queen performing it.


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Even The Muppets have their take on this iconic piece.


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But so does THUD — The Harvard Undergraduate Drummers.


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The video above is their rendition of Bohemian Rhapsody with plastic pipes.

Some might wonder how this justifies the high cost of going to Harvard. If they do, they are missing the point. This is part of their education and the type that actually matters. It is the application of creative thought. It is cooperation where the sum is more than the combination of its parts, i.e., true collaboration.

If you do not get that, you need an education. Perhaps not at Harvard. These YouTube videos are a good start.

The videos below illustrate a product and a bit of insight into processes that led to the product.


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I like harping on seeing the processes and behind the product.

Why? Schooling still focuses too much on the products of learning and not enough on the processes.

Why? The products are easier to see and assess; the processes are less tangible and difficult to evaluate. And yet, the processes are what last and are thus more important.

The top two winners of the recently concluded Britain’s Got Talent have what some might label disabilities.

These were the final results.

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And here were their performances during the finals.

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So, remind me — what makes someone disabled again? Do we focus on disability or this ability?


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This video claims that it showcases “Things Every Teacher Can Relate To”.

Not quite. I am sure that most teachers here do not know what a snow day is. They will also not relate to “spring forward, fall back” time changes.

Likewise teachers elsewhere might not be required to pay for parking at school or know what to do with exam candidates affected by train delays.

Teachers share many things across the globe, but they also differ greatly. It is far more difficult to showcase or celebrate their differences.

For example, I am quite certain that most teachers here cannot relate to the plight of some teachers in the USA. The recent protests and walkouts in Oklahoma as just one example.


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Any teacher here worried about paying for parking or spotty wifi access at the periphery of a large campus needs some perspective. The video immediately above provides some.

The best way to start change is to identify what needs changing in the first place. This seems so obvious as to sound redundant, but you have probably seen how blind change initiatives can be.

So if we are to desire change in schools, we must know what is wrong with them. Here are two videos that outline some critical issues.


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The video above highlights how most schools:

  • Are based on outdated Industrial Age values.
  • Do not promote student autonomy.
  • Perpetuate inauthentic learning.
  • Do not accommodate student passions.
  • Provide little or no room for individualisation.
  • Rely on lecturing.


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The video above uses social conflict theory to explore social inequalities that school reinforce or perpetuate. While the video focuses on schools embedded in US systems, the principles apply to any system that claims to be based on meritocracy.

Both videos shed light on what areas need urgent change.

Both videos are also not perfect — both equate education with schooling. They could have drawn distinctions between the two terms because both seemed to desire movement away from schooling and progress towards education.

Schooling is about enculturation. Education is about self-actualisation.


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