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Posts Tagged ‘videos

The top two winners of the recently concluded Britain’s Got Talent have what some might label disabilities.

These were the final results.

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And here were their performances during the finals.

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So, remind me — what makes someone disabled again? Do we focus on disability or this ability?


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This video claims that it showcases “Things Every Teacher Can Relate To”.

Not quite. I am sure that most teachers here do not know what a snow day is. They will also not relate to “spring forward, fall back” time changes.

Likewise teachers elsewhere might not be required to pay for parking at school or know what to do with exam candidates affected by train delays.

Teachers share many things across the globe, but they also differ greatly. It is far more difficult to showcase or celebrate their differences.

For example, I am quite certain that most teachers here cannot relate to the plight of some teachers in the USA. The recent protests and walkouts in Oklahoma as just one example.


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Any teacher here worried about paying for parking or spotty wifi access at the periphery of a large campus needs some perspective. The video immediately above provides some.

The best way to start change is to identify what needs changing in the first place. This seems so obvious as to sound redundant, but you have probably seen how blind change initiatives can be.

So if we are to desire change in schools, we must know what is wrong with them. Here are two videos that outline some critical issues.


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The video above highlights how most schools:

  • Are based on outdated Industrial Age values.
  • Do not promote student autonomy.
  • Perpetuate inauthentic learning.
  • Do not accommodate student passions.
  • Provide little or no room for individualisation.
  • Rely on lecturing.


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The video above uses social conflict theory to explore social inequalities that school reinforce or perpetuate. While the video focuses on schools embedded in US systems, the principles apply to any system that claims to be based on meritocracy.

Both videos shed light on what areas need urgent change.

Both videos are also not perfect — both equate education with schooling. They could have drawn distinctions between the two terms because both seemed to desire movement away from schooling and progress towards education.

Schooling is about enculturation. Education is about self-actualisation.

Two days ago, I reminisced on my family’s time in the USA. Yes, the USA, not America.

Earlier this year, I explained why I insist on using “the USA” instead of “America”. My fuel then was a combination of geographical technicality and social inclusion.


Now I have more fuel in the form of YouTube videos. “America” is tainted — selective lenses from the press and social media bubbles sometimes sow doubt and disunity about These United States.
 

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The videos above portray the USA that I knew and experienced. This was the combined efforts of individuals and communities that operated on kindness, hope, and basic human decency.

Are they the minority? Yes, perhaps. But when you add all the minorities up, you get a majority. When you join these separate jigsaw pieces, you get a more complete picture of united states and the United States.

The USA is not just a function of its current leadership, its movies, and its broadcast media. It is about its people and what they do. Like every other country on earth, there are nasty and ignorant people there that get a lot of attention. The good ones go about their daily business without glory.

Shift your gaze and focus on the good to get a more balanced and accurate view. It is not disunited America; it is these United States of America.

Today I highlight two videos that provide insights into current issues.


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The first is about what some workers are worried about — robots taking over their jobs. This is an issue made real by what people can already see happening around them.

It seems to be a relatively immediate threat, so policymakers and workers alike spread and share the worry.


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The second is about the harm that Facebook has brought. Facebook ostensibly wanted to do good, but in reaching almost everyone on this planet, did not regulate its own ambition.

This issue is less obvious to most people than the previous one. However, I think that it is as big a threat, if not bigger, than robots taking over jobs. Robotisation is a result of many agencies and stakeholders that are subject to rules and standards; Facebook is one mega corporation that makes its own rules and standards.

The irony is that laypeople has little say in robotisation. But we make Facebook what it is and we empower — and possibly embolden — it by using it indiscriminately or not objecting to its poor practices.

How more myopic can we get?

Schools that use the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI) for career guidance and other programmes need to learn what a sham and scam it is.

The MBTI is not scientifically-based, and yet companies make a healthy profit off the tests they offer to schools and workplaces. But I fear that this important message falls on deaf ears.

If you cannot reach them, you cannot teach them.

One of my teaching mantras is that if you cannot reach them, you cannot teach them. Since scientific thinking and hard facts about the fallacy of the Myers-Briggs personality test might be too boring and dry, here is something to whet the appetite.


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For a fuller and more satisfying meal, try this menu item.


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Videos are not teaching material miracles in themselves. If I recorded myself just stating the facts, I would create a video-based lecture. Then not only would I have deaf ears, I would also get closed eyes.

The two videos above are spiced with a bit of drama and simplification, but they stay true to the story and facts. They are designed to disarm the learner and elicit emotions. Only then might they inform.

This reverses the order of traditional teaching, which seeks to inform first and perhaps does not even disarm and elicit. This is one way effective videos level up in order to reach before they teach.

Thanks to YouTube’s algorithms, I discovered a talented musician named Andrew Huang.

This is the original 24K Magic music video by Bruno Mars.


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This is Andrew Huang’s take on the same song with carrots as instruments.


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His creativity stemmed from a challenge to recreate the song about 24 carats with 24 carrots.

There is much more of Huang’s work. The videos below are Can’t Feel My Face by The Weeknd and Huang’s version using instruments at his dentist’s office.


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This creative expression could have been a combination of making the ordinary less so and learning from a painful experience. You might not feel your face after receiving numbing agents from a dentist.

Huang is undoubtedly talented and we might pick up lessons on creativity. Creativity often:

  • originates from a challenge.
  • emerges from the mundane.
  • is a different way of looking at the same problem.

Creativity might also include being able to see useful links between different domains, e.g., entertainment and education, or personal and professional. 


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