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Posts Tagged ‘videos

I reminded myself of two change principles after watching the videos below.


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The first principle is: Don’t preach, teach instead. The second is: Don’t sell a story, tell the story.

In both cases, you let your audience decide to learn and change. Tell the story well and without preaching, and you are more likely to get learners and changers.

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This is the original.


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It is impressive, but out-of-date and left out countries like Singapore.

This is the remake based on that original.


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The redux was not just copy and paste. A considerable amount of effort (of a different sort) went into making it.

What I shared on Saturday by citing the work of others also took effort. Other than connecting the two separate pieces, it required the ability to curate. This meant reading, evaluating, archiving, and republishing.

Here are two initial rules for anyone teaching kids about generating and sharing content. One, anything of significance is rarely unique. Two, we stand on the shoulders of giants — acknowledge them or risk getting flicked off.

Coding, however it is defined and implemented, will be taught at primary and secondary schools.

Whatever is taught, I hope that students will not learn the WHAT and HOW without knowing WHY of coding. If they need ideas or inspiration, they might watch this YouTube video.


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This group of dancers aged 11 to 13 code not just for an app or STEM. They code for artistic expression. They code to pursue a passion. They code to move people.

By some coincidence, I watched this video of Itzhak Perlman who was offering master classes online.


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Perlman said he would ask his students: Is there a difference between being intense and being passionate?

Our coding curriculum might be rigorous or even intense. But will it also be passionate? By this I ask if it will give learners ownership and nurture empathy.

Intensity is something we can subject students to. Introducing another possibly siloed subject into their lives will make learning intense even if we try to sell it as fun or forward-looking. We should not dance around this issue.

Passion is something we help students discover and develop. Nurturing passion starts with helping students identify with needs, both theirs and others. This opens the path to empathy. Students then take the responsibility to problem seek and problem solve.

If we rely on intensity, we will have to keep pushing students to learn. If we start with passion, students will push themselves to their own ends.

No, not the Singaporean utterance of “truck, lah” but the creation of a truck from a Tesla car.


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The video above is an “ad” for the Truckla. It is a product in the sense that it showcases a product (the Truckla) which was itself a product of collaboration.


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The second video is a behind-the-scenes look of how the Truckla product and the “ad” were created. It is a process video.

Like most process-product videos I feature in this blog, the process videos run long while the product videos are short.

This mirrors what we see in classrooms: People tend to judge and value the products of learning because they are easier to quantify. But it is the messier and more detailed processes that provide insights into how the product came to be. If we focus on processes more, we might reward even sub-par products because we can gauge how much learners actually do.

YouTube provides a constant flow of videos that help me illustrate the importance of looking at the processes behind products.

This product is about as viral as it gets.


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The inspiration and processes behind the polished product is not as well known.


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For the neutral observer, the second video provides insights into the processes that contributed to a viral video. For an educator, the behind-the-scenes processes are just as important, if not more so, than the final product.

Here is a bonus video of Lil Nas visiting an elementary school in the USA.


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When I highlight videos that showcase products and the processes that created them, I normally have to show them in that order. This is because their creators share them that way.

I liked how one Tasty producer, Rie McClenny, opted to share them the other way around.


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Rie provided video insights into the numerous processes of a video product five days before releasing the end result. The process video was about 9 minutes long while the product video took almost 3.5 minutes.

If there is anything that educators who are interested in e-portfolios should take note it is these:

  • It is the processes that are as important — or even more important — than the final product.
  • The time spent on reviewing and reflecting on the processes should overshadow that of the product.

Anyone not living under a rock will know that the current cultural entertainment phenomena are Avengers: Endgame and Game of Thrones.

Any educator worth their salt could take advantage of them. Videos that analyze their content are not only seeds, hooks, and drivers of content, they might also be used to teach nuance and critical thinking.


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The video above is one such example. It provides a low entry barrier, a shared experience, and cognitive dissonance among the learners.

An educator might leverage on such a video by highlighting how it models nuanced and critical thinking. By facilitating discussion and reflection the same educator can teach her students to do the same.


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