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Posts Tagged ‘video

If you are going to use video game-based teaching to have video game-based learning, you also need to align the assessment for video games.

What schools and educational institutions often do instead is use video games to try to teach content. The more informed ones ones might focus on attitudes and skills, but most stop at content acquisition. That is why the tests remain in the traditional realm.


Video source

The pedagogy needs to be aligned with the assessment. So what might assessment that leverages on video games look like? The video above provides some clues. Spoiler: The tests are performative, not just cognitive.

If we measure only for cognitive outcomes, other methods might already be efficient and/or effective for the teaching and learning of content. This is not so say that we should not also test for cognitive outcomes. But we need to be aware that our current assessment falls short. This is why new interventions often have negative or “no significant differences”.

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I process most things from an educator’s perspective. So when this talented artiste performed Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody 42 ways, I thought about teaching.


Video source

Are we one-trick ponies? Or can we switch strategies and use different tools when the context and learning need dictate?

Teaching is not as glamorous or flashy as the video performance, but we can still learn from it. The video is a result of much practice, application of creativity, correcting mistakes, and persisting when there is resistance.

What are we doing to build up our teaching repertoires?

My guess is that most people would watch the video below and wonder if they can trust what they see and hear if what is on screen can be manipulated so easily.


Video source

The fact remains that what we already see, hear, and experience in person and in other media can be manipulated. So should we be more worried?

I say we be aware of the capabilities in arms race of video manipulation and fakery. We should also maintain a health skepticism of what we read, watch, or listen to.

We might also not assume that technology is inherently good or evil. The video manipulation technology that could be used for extortion and entrapment is the same that is useful for experimentation and entertainment.

Technology is the toolset that wields that power. The title and the last sentence were what I took away from watching the video below.


Video source

Neil deGrasse Tyson has a way of using plain speak to explain science. In emphasising the importance of scientific literacy, he told a story about Christopher Columbus and opined the outcome of a theoretical alien visit.

He told a story of how Columbus fooled native Americans with his knowledge of a lunar eclipse. He also explained why intelligent life in the form of aliens, not just movie versions, would beat us flat if it came to that.

Knowledge becomes power when you have something that someone else does not. However, that power is empty until the knowledge is embodied in technology as a form of delivery.

If that principle holds true, then why are some teachers still withholding technology from (or using older technologies with) their students? Might they be trying to cling on to power as misguided practice?

Tell anyone to watch a YouTube video and ask them what they think. You are likely to get different answers from different people.

I watched the video below through the lenses of an educator.


Video source

The video was a reminder that we are not mind readers. So we need to be the learner to deeply understand and empathise with the learner. There is no substitute.

Today I continue my reflection on the CNA article and video, Regardless of Class.

The video segments on what kids thought about the “class divide” caught my attention the most. There were clips of children aged 9 to 11, and older students aged 15 to 17.


Video source

The whole video is proprietary on CNA’s site, but most of the segments featuring both sets of kids are in the YouTube video above.

The footage and editing sent a clear signal: The younger kids were perceptive and honest about the class divide; by the time they were older, the gaps were
brutally obvious.

The video, particularly in its longer form, made for uncomfortable viewing. Rightly so because the full video was designed to create cognitive and emotional dissonance.

Such dissonance might lead to questions like:

  • How is our schooling system creating and perpetuating such class divides?
  • What might we do to mitigate this?
  • If schooling is, as one teacher pointed out, a symptom and not a cause of social divides, what other contributing factors of social divides might we also need to address?

After repeated and reflective readings of the article and viewings of the videos, I am convinced that what happens at and to the family unit is crucial.

Disadvantaged adults pass their status on to their children and it is difficult for the latter to break out of their structural and social strata. Adults with greater means not only pass their privilege to their offspring, they also find ways to boost what they have.

Fundamental to what adults and parents do is their attitudes and mindsets. Are they defeated by or defiant to their lot in life? Do they believe they have a right to a better life and is this right reserved only for some?

So I wonder simplistically: We have SkillsFuture now; do we need AttitudeFuture and MindsetFuture as well?

We might have the SkillsFuture programme that is supposed to provide post-schooling and lifelong resources for learning. But after reading the article and watching the video linked to the tweet below, I wonder if we need something akin to AttitudeFuture or MindFuture.

Here are a few things I took note of and have thoughts on, particularly from the article linked from the tweet.

I have no doubt that the “class divide” is a critical issue that might potentially disrupt what Singapore stands for. So I was not surprised that this threat was identified by almost half of the 1,036 survey respondents.

That said, “class” is insidious and hard to define. It has multiple contributing factors and layers like education, socioeconomic status, family background, etc. I wonder if respondents had the same things in mind when they thought of class.

Other factors like race and religion were identified as threats to social cohesion by about a fifth of the respondents. However, these perceived factors might have a disproportionate effect in reality.

I am reminded of a tweet from satirical Twitter account, Werner Twertzog:

A third of the population can act on another third while the last third remains indifferent. A minority or a seemingly small threat can have a disproportionate impact.

This does not mean that the class divide less impactful. The class divide is also worsened by indifference, which is why the article and video are important to consume and process now.

I am still ruminating on the article and video. Both provided much to reflect on even though they undoubtedly present only snippets and snapshots of a complicated and nuanced social phenomenon. I think I will focus on what school children and teachers think and do in the next part.


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