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Posts Tagged ‘video

Ordinarily I would not share a video like the one below. There is nothing wrong with it. It is just not something I would share as a functional extrovert.


Video source

But when I linked three things I experienced from as far back as my undergraduate days to an event just last week, the purpose of sharing such a video became clear.

When I first stepped into university, I had a conversation with what some might call a flamboyant professor. Our chat strayed and he described himself as functional extrovert. That phrase was about playing a role as the context needed and has stuck with me since.

A few years ago, I detected a movement of sorts among some teachers who seemed to be resisting workshops and school initiatives that were cooperative or collaborative in nature. One of the leading concerns was whether the trend of teachers needing to work together — whether within the school walls or wide outside of them — was detrimental to “introverted” teachers. Some of these teachers were probably resistant or stubborn; a few had genuine concerns.

Last week I met with a group of educators to discuss revisions to criteria we used for evaluating novice instructors and facilitators. One category of criteria bugged me because it was worded in a manner that valued frontal teaching. The frontal criteria are important at times for lectures and public speaking, but our processes focused on facilitation which required more connective competencies. The criteria seemed to punish those that were not charismatic or lacked the gift of the gab.

The line linking these three events was an implicit assumption on what it means to be an introvert. That assumption is accompanied by others like whether introversion was inferior, if this placed introverts at a disadvantage, and if an introvert’s traits are not rewarded or recognised in good teaching.

A more fundamental question is: What is introversion? That is where the video comes in. It answers this question by highlighting five myths about being introverted. Introverts:

  1. Can make good leaders
  2. Are not necessarily smarter than extroverts
  3. Do not always want to be alone
  4. Do not hate people
  5. Are not necessarily shy

When I was in Denmark a few years ago, my host asked me what I learnt from travelling overseas. I gave my standard reply: For the important things, we are more alike than different.

This is a particularly important lesson in today because of the social climate and our membership as world citizens. So I was pleased to find this video from a Danish broadcaster.


Video source

The video starts with people being put in boxes. We then discover that people move out of those categories into new ones based on different contexts we put them in and the questions we ask of them.

While it is human to take cognitive shortcuts by categorisation, it is far more important to question and challenge those categories. I would wager that by asking more questions and issuing more challenges to ourselves, we learn more about others. Then we might discover that we struggle with the same issues because we have the same differences.

When this principle is applied in schooling and education, we might question if single curricula and standard assessments are logical for different learners.

Last month I pondered on how I could use a YouTube video on Trump’s tweets to teach discourse analysis.

Earlier this week I chanced upon a video that might be used to illustrate how to report discourse analysis.


Video source

By relying on the expertise of a debate master, the creators of this video outlined how Kellyanne Conway deals with questions that get thrown her way and how she frustrates journalists.

Her strategies were to:

  1. Deflect by repeating keywords and going off on a tangent.
  2. Take advantage of the politeness of interviewers and their need to move on to other questions.
  3. Pass the buck when she did not have answers.
  4. Fabricate information.

These strategies were a result of basic analysis: Listening and watching videos of Conway, noting patterns, chunking patterns, and verifying patterns. That is a simplified version of a how-to of video content analysis.

What is valuable in this video is how the evidence was presented. The pattern was textbook: Present each main strategy, illustrate it once, illustrate it again, and explain it concisely to remove doubt.

As much as I would rather not have videos of Trump or Conway as fodder for learning these skills, they are a reminder that good things can emerge from bad if we know how to look. The content itself is emotionally charged and this can be leveraged on to create memorable lessons and to show novices how to be objective when it matters.

Did you ever consider how beer could be used to spread the message of the importance of diversity? Now that would be drinking responsibly!


Video source

Molson, a Canadian beer brand, did just that.

The video also had a hotspot link to a making-of video to reveal ideas and processes behind the product. HAD. The link did not work when I tried it because it is either offline or private.

This is a shame because such videos provide insights into how great ideas are born and nurtured. They make design thinking real.

Thankfully there is a behind-the-scenes video of an earlier project that involved the scanning of passports. But it leaves you wanting more. More insights, not more beer.


Video source

All that said, such videos are not just educationally useful for illustrating process and product, they are critical as 2017 starts with so much attention on closing borders, clamping up, and shutting down progress.

The first video shows how different people can work together and then enjoy the fruits of their labour. The second shows a bit of the nitty-gritty to make that happen.

Rick and Morty is an animated series that is waiting for its third season.

It is not for the faint-hearted because it makes you laugh from openings you might not realise you have. It can be rude and crude, but -oh-so intelligent.


Video source

So it should come as little surprise that it is possible to use Rick and Morty to illustrate human cognition, confirmation bias, and how correlation is not the same as causation.

This just goes to show how just about anything can be used to teach anything else. The key is an educator who can think both creatively and critically.

I never thought I would ever type this: There are valuable lessons in Trump’s tweets.

I am not referring to learning how NOT to be inflammatory. I am thinking about how his tweets are good for discourse analysis. I am doing this thanks to this insightful video by Nerdwriter1.


Video source

The video creator did a great job of chunking Trump’s tweets by type and nuance in numbers, and analysing their design and impact.

I might use this video as a resource if I get a chance to work with a group of teachers who need to learn how to do discourse analysis for the purpose of narrative-style reporting and research writing.

If I do, this will show how one might learn from something negative.

This video-maker asked an important question: WHAT will you learn in 2017?


Video source

While he focused on nice-to-have skills, the same questions could be asked of any current day worker who needs to keep learning to stay relevant.

An equally important question is: HOW will you learn?

There are so many opportunities, many of them at very low cost or free. Those who have learnt to search wisely and curate judiciously leverage on YouTube and social media channels.

There is no need to wait for a professional development unit or a training department to get a curriculum approved or a content module developed. The end result of the wait may be a slick product, but the process is too slow to be relevant.

I will continue to use blogs, RSS, and Twitter to learn every day. How will you learn in 2017? Will you talk about learning in the 21st century? Or will you actually learn like it is already the early 21st century?


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