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Posts Tagged ‘video


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You are never too old to learn from the past, and to invent and inspire the future.


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You are never to old to learn from what is current and to create based on what you have now.

There are some videos that you watch on YouTube and there are others that are on Vimeo. Those in Vimeo tend to be in a class of their own.

A good example is this animation about two robots mining gems.
 

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There is not a word uttered in the video, but the message is clear: Cooperation is constructive; competition can be destructive.

The same could apply in the context of schooling. There will be times when competition is important or even necessary, e.g., competitive sports, fund-raising, friendly rivalries.

But there are times when it is counterproductive, e.g., teachers not sharing resources or students not helping each other in order to stay ahead.

Unlike in the video, the impact of negative forms of competition are not always and immediately obvious. They fester and rot, and as they normalise, we say it is just part of our culture or defend it by saying there is nothing wrong with competition.

Competition is not always a good thing. If you cannot see that, then you need to let these two robots remind you why.

Last week I posted my tirade against using every emerging or evolving technology for just show-and-tell.


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Might Google’s Jamboard be any different?

Every tool we create and use is not driven simply by its technological affordances. There are also social drivers, and in the case of schooling and education, pedagogical ones.

So if teachers and administrators only look at greater efficiency, the glorified interactive white remains just that, but with a cloud-based safety net.

But if they focus also on effectiveness, they might discover different or new ways of teaching. Like designing for small group collaboration or remote work or making thinking visible.

I love this Wired video series where an expert teaches five learners at very different levels. I highlighted a previous video last month in which a neuroscientist discussed connectomes.


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In the video above, another biologist was challenged to discuss CRISPR at five individuals: Child, teenager, college student, graduate student, and expert.

The previous five-level video inspired me to link it to personalised teaching. This video might remind teachers how they might teach at any and all levels. They should seek to ask questions, not just answers.

At each level, the biologist asked at least one question:

  1. Child: Do you know what a genome is?
  2. Teenager: What do you think about being able to edit genomes?
  3. College student: Do you know how CRISPR works?
  4. Graduate student: (Are there) any unintended consequences?
  5. Expert: How are you using gene editing in your own work?

Despite the different types of questions, they shared the same property. The questions drove to where the learner was likely at and were designed to build knowledge from that point.

If you seek to indoctrinate, provide the answers. If you seek to educate, provide questions.

Too often teaching starts with answers without questions. This only teaches students how NOT to ask questions. This also reinforces in teachers not to ask good questions or to not get students to do the same.

I share below a few image quotes I created in 2015 and 2016 that highlight the importance of leading with questions. These image quotes and many others are available in one of my Google Photos galleries.

The best teachers are those who show you where to look, but don't tell you what to see. — Alexandra K. Trenfor

We learn more by looking for the answer to a question and not finding it than we do from learning the answer itself. -- Lord Alexander.

Good GRADES may help you LOOK smart. Good QUESTIONS help you GET smart.

Have you ever stood in front of a mirror and said a word (any word) out loud over and over again? That word starts to lose its meaning and it might start to sound funny.

The video below explains why.


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So how does meaninglessness result from repetition?

Psychologically, it stems from semantic satiation.

Neurologically, it is dues to to reactive inhibition.

Pedagogically, it can be called drill and practice. Or most homework.

Ask just five different people to define “expertise” and you are likely to get five different answers.

If you asked me, I would say that a practised expert is one who has made the most mistakes, learnt from them, and is able to share wisdoms from learning from mistakes.

After I watched this YouTube video, I have another perspective on what it means to be an expert.


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One thing that Andrew Huang is known for is making music with normally non-musical objects.

In recreating the song from the movie Moana he had to see both the broad piece and devil in the details. He was able to deconstruct the important constituent parts of the whole while not losing sight of the latter. This might seem obvious when one appreciates the final product.

However, one only needs to imagine how difficult the task is by taking the perspective of the designer and creator of the overall piece. Huang makes the work look easy when it is not.

So my other perspective on expertise is this: It is the ability to zoom in and out at details and the overall picture so that one can deal with both.


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As I watched this YouTube video about a maker-cosplayer building his own K-2S0 “costume”, I wondered about what “maker spaces” represent in schools.

Are these places good-to-haves or must-haves? Are they PR showcases or actual tinkering spaces? Are activities driven partly by curriculum, or largely by passion?

What are the honest answers to these questions? What are the hard truths and blatant lies we have to face up to about maker spaces?

In my opinion, maker spaces should be built on just one foundation: Learner passion. This allows any learning environment to be a “maker space”, even a conventional and seemingly resource-poor one. Learners make and make do in these circumstances and in any subject.

I am not just making this up. Reflect on what is important about maker spaces and you might arrive at a similar conclusion. 


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