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Posts Tagged ‘test

272/365: Student by Rrrodrigo, on Flickr
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Recently I read an article on The Atlantic, The End of Paper-and-Pencil Exams?

The headline asked a speculative question, but did not deliver a clear answer. It hinted at mammoth change, but revealed that dinosaurs still rule.

Here is the short version.

This is what 13,000 4th grade students in the USA had to do in an online test that was part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. They had to respond to test prompts to:

  • Persuade: Write a letter to your principal, giving reasons and examples why a particular school mascot should be chosen.
  • Explain: Write in a way that will help the reader understand what lunchtime is like during the school day.
  • Convey: While you were asleep, you were somehow transported to a sidewalk underneath the Eiffel Tower. Write what happens when you wake up there.

This pilot online assessment was scored by human beings. The results were that 40% of students struggled to respond to question prompts as they were rated a 2 (marginal) or 1 (little or no skill) on a 6 point scale.

This was one critique of the online test:

One downside to the NCES pilot study: It doesn’t compare student answers with similar questions answered in a traditional written exam setting.

I disagree that this is necessary. Why should the benchmark be the paper test? Why is a comparison even necessary?

While the intention is to compare the questions, what a paper vs computer-based test might do is actually compare media. After all, the questions are essentially the same, or by some measure very similar.

Cornelia Orr, executive director of the National Assessment Governing Board, stated at a webinar on the results that:

When students are interested in what they’re writing about, they’re better able to sustain their level of effort, and they perform better.

So the quality and type of questions are the greater issues. The medium and strategy of choice (going online and using what is afforded there) also influence the design of questions.

Look at it another way: Imagine that the task was to create a YouTube video that could persuade, explain, or convey. It would not make sense to ask students to write about the video. They would have to design and create it.

If the argument is that the YouTube video’s technical, literacy, and thinking skills are not in the curriculum, I would ask why that curriculum has excluded these relevant and important skills.

The news article mentioned some desired outcomes:

The central goal of the Common Core is deeper knowledge, where students are able to draw conclusions and craft analysis, rather than simply memorize rote fact.

An online test should not be a copy of the paper version. It should have unGoogleable questions so that students can still Google, but they must be tested on their ability to “draw conclusions and craft analysis, rather than simply memorize rote fact”.

An online test should be about collaborating in real-time, responding to real-world issues, and creating what is real to the learners now and in their future.

An online test should not be mired in the past. It might save on paper-related costs and perhaps make some grading more efficient. But that focuses on what administrators and teachers want. It fails to provide what learners need.

If this tweet was a statement in a sermon, I would say amen to that.

Teachers, examiners, and adminstrators disallow and fear technology because doing what has always been done is just more comfortable and easier.

Students are forced to travel back in time and not use today’s technologies in order to take tests that measure a small aspect of their worth. They bear with this burden because their parents and teachers tell them they must get good grades. To some extent that is true as they attempt to move from one level or institution to another.

But employers and even universities are not just looking for grades. When students interact with their peers and the world around them, they learn that character, reputation, and other fuzzy traits not measured in exams are just as important, if not more so.

Tests are losing relevance in more ways than one. They are not in sync with the times and they do not measure what we really need.

In an assessment and evaluation Ice Age, there is cold comfort in the slowness of change. There is also money to be made from everything that leads up to testing, the testing itself, and the certification that follows.

 
Like a glacier, assessment systems change so slowly that most of us cannot perceive any movement. But move they do. Some glaciers might even be melting in the heat of performance evaluations, e-portfolios, and exams where students are allowed to Google.

We can either wait the Ice Age out or warm up to the process of change.

By reading what thought leaders share every day and by blogging, I bring my magnifying glass to examine issues and create hotspots. By facilitating courses in teacher education I hope to bring fuel, heat, and oxygen to light little fires where I can.

What are you going to do in 2014?

I was thinking about how testing and grading were contributing to things like competitive tuition syndrome here and the race to the bottom in the US.

I was also wondering why politicians and policymakers were hitting the panic button when students in their countries did not do well in international tests like TIMMS and PISA. Was it really possible to draw a straight line from grades to economic success?

I seriously doubted it as there are many more important factors that contribute to the well-being of a country. Put another way, who cares if your students are not test-smart but are world leaders and world beaters in various fields?


Video source

I gained some perspective when I watched the closing ISTE 2012 keynote by Yong Zhao. The video is long, but the important bit starts at the 54-minute mark.

In short, Yong Zhao illustrated how there was a negative correlation between test scores like PISA and entrepreneurial indicators. A country whose students did well in tests would not guarantee economic success.

But correlations do not explain phenomena. Low test scores do not cause high entrepreneurial capability. The numbers do not reveal truths, but neither do they lie. They merely hide deeper issues that need to be explored and explained.

Yong Zhao did this by asking and answering three questions in his keynote:

  1. What matters more? Test scores or confidence?
  2. Are you tolerant of talent? Do you allow it to exist? Do you support it?
  3. Are you taking advantage of the resources you have? Or do you impoverish yourself in the pursuit of test scores?

I think he had one statement that practically addressed all three questions. In explaining why US students did poorly in tests but well on the world economic stage, he said:

Creativity cannot be taught… but it can be killed. American schools don’t teach it better. We kill it less successfully.
Video source

Our schooling system pins creativity to the ground and mindless tuition applies the coup de grâce.

I wish we could be less successful killers of creativity too…


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