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Posts Tagged ‘teachers

In “olds” made news, this report tells us what we already know: Singapore teachers are paid very well and they are overworked.

So instead of focusing on established fact, I concentrate on how the latest facts were established. In the process, I illustrate principles of Skepticism 101.

First, were the 200 teachers from each country representative of the teacher population?

A sample of 200 might be statistically sound, but there was no information about how the sampling was conducted. For example, were the numbers garnered from a convenience sampling of respondents, e.g., from a limited set of schools or a captive audience?

We’re all 200 beginning teachers or was there a proportionate mix? If there was a mix of teacher experience, how many beginning teachers were used to determine their average starting salaries?

Second, the starting salaries of beginning teachers in Singapore was very high. The amount was equivalent to what a local assistant professor might make a decade ago.

Even taking into account salaries that keep pace with the rising cost of living, there was no information on whether the sampled teachers here were mid-career switchers, hired by independent/private schools, and/or Masters or Ph.D. holders. All these teachers typically command higher starting salaries.

It was entirely clear if the salaries were relative or absolute. If they were relative, they would be scaled to the cost of living in each country. If the numbers were absolute, then you would have to make comparisons of salaries from different Jon’s within each country and not between teachers of different countries.

Third, the definition of work hours was not clear. Were these official or unofficial work hours? Was the average over term time or over the entire calendar year? What if some teachers reported office hours but not weekend marking?

Were the salaries and work hours compared against data that the Ministry of Education here might have? This was not the job of the producers of the report; this was something the newspaper could have done to add meaning and value.
 

 
I do not doubt that teachers here are well-paid and work-stressed. But as long as the processes (i.e., data sampling and analyses) were murky, I do not trust the product (the report). When a news article further simplified the report, this muddied the water even more.

World Teachers’ Day has been marked annually on October 5th since 1994. According to UNESCO:

World Teachers’ Day commemorates the anniversary of the adoption of the 1966 ILO/UNESCO Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers. This Recommendation sets benchmarks regarding the rights and responsibilities of teachers and standards for their initial preparation and further education, recruitment, employment, and teaching and learning conditions.


Video source

It is celebrated differently in various places or not at all. The video above is Ellen’s way. Singapore marks our own day in September.

I wonder when we might be more inclusive and global in our outlook on teachers and teaching. As much as teachers have in common in terms of problems, each system has its own issues. Teachers here might appreciate what they have here even more if they understood what their counterparts elsewhere do not.

Mainstream schools in Singapore celebrate Teachers’ Day (TD) today. School teachers will get a day off and would have received cards and presents from their students.

I am marking the day by conducting a workshop for future faculty. If memory serves me right, I had classes or workshops every TD for at least a decade.

I do not feel sore about this because institutions of higher education generally do not share the same special day* for their educators. I hope that future faculty will not be disappointed.

*I am not referring to teaching awards and ceremonies as these are typically top-down events. I am referring to bottom-up practices led by those immediately impacted by our actions — the learners.

Perhaps things will turn around in the higher education arena one day. Maybe the powers-that-be will start with an apology for not recognising the thankless tasks of teaching and facilitating.

If they need ideas, here is one from popular culture.


Video source

The rest of the year, teaching is a thankless form of caring, mentoring, and preparing. Teachers parent kids, influence citizens, and mould taxpayers. We should apologise if we are less than grateful. We could start with saying sorry for taking their “free” parking away.

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I received this screenshot of what seemed to be an unintentionally funny description of a local university.

From ambit to armpit.

I asked the sender where is was from, but that question drew a blank. Bonus pre-lesson: Seek the source.

I applied that lesson by searching for SUSS and a segment of the description. This led me to the Wikipedia article on Education in Singapore.

The segment currently reads:

In 2017, Singapore University of Social Sciences (SUSS) was declared as the country’s sixth autonomous public university. The university was previously established in 2005 as SIM University by the SIM Group. Thereafter it undergone restructuring and is currently under the ambit of the Ministry of Education.

It is still not grammatically sound, but there is no more armpit. The description is less whimsical with ambit.

If you examine the history of the document, you will find an editing battle. The original word was ambit. It was changed to armpit in May 2018. It was not until June that armpit was reverted to ambit.

Here is the bad news: Teachers were responsible for passing the armpit edit along. While it was good for a laugh, it revealed a lack of digital literacy.

The good news is this lesson: You can learn how to check the history of an online document like a wiki page. In the case of Wikipedia, you need only look for the “View history” link (currently at the top of each page).

Bonus lesson: Do not use words like “ambit” that tempt pranksters to change them to “armpit”. Both words work — one is descriptive and the other is hilarious.

As a teacher educator, I find this tweet terrifying.

It is terrifying:

  • that this still needs to be said.
  • that the point is still relevant.
  • even in Singapore’s context.
  • especially in Singapore’s context.

The tweet is a reminder that what is olds to me is news to someone else.

The debate on whether Singapore teachers should get to park their cars for “free” while they are at work refuses to go away.

Some might say that the arguments are pointless because the Auditor General’s Office (AGO) has already determined that teachers must pay for parking. However, the prime issue is not about free parking, but about how such decisions are made.

A Member of Parliament (MP) critiqued the approach of implementing policy from an economic lens and urged “a conversation about reciprocity, trust, and relationships” instead [edited version of MP’s speech].

We need to insert and steer our values into the national conversation about prosperity and growth. We need to balance the economic reasoning with moral reasoning. We need to make what is cheap, efficient, and quick to what is fair, just, and right.

— Seah Kian Peng

The critique was countered in a parliamentary reply that included how the Ministry of Education had been transparent and consultative. I am not commenting on that claim because I do not wish to turn healthy skepticism into unreasonable cynicism.

I actually do not like how dependent we still are on cars. I expressed this conviction when I cycled to school when I was a teacher and took the bus to campus when I was a professor. I still take bus 11 (walk, bike), and rely on the bus and train now. So I do not really have a stake the parking issue.

I do, however, have a stake in the mindsets and well-being of our teachers and educators. I still operate as a teacher educator and I have long observed that pedagogical issues are not compartmentalised from economic ones.

The crux of the “clean wage” argument seems to be one of transparency — you should not get benefits that others in the civil service do not enjoy.

But teachers are civil servants like no other. Teachers do not submit claims for stationery that schools do not provide. Nor do they ask for compensation for treats they might provide students when both they and their students go the extra mile.

Speaking of which, how many civil servants claim lost family time, weekends, and vacation time because they have to:

  • make corrections on work they have to bring home?
  • plan for lessons before the work week?
  • chaperone kids for training, performances, or overseas trips?

If we cannot abide by having hidden benefits, how can we accept hidden costs?

Furthermore, some things cannot be compartmentalised, quantified, and paid for like parking spaces. Teachers give because they tend to be nurturing. Can we not take better care of them in return?

Viewed through an economic lens, a wage looks unclean if a teacher gets free parking. But viewed with a moral filter, slapping fees on such civil servants who already give so much and do not complain about now having to also pay for parking is filthy.


Video source

This video claims that it showcases “Things Every Teacher Can Relate To”.

Not quite. I am sure that most teachers here do not know what a snow day is. They will also not relate to “spring forward, fall back” time changes.

Likewise teachers elsewhere might not be required to pay for parking at school or know what to do with exam candidates affected by train delays.

Teachers share many things across the globe, but they also differ greatly. It is far more difficult to showcase or celebrate their differences.

For example, I am quite certain that most teachers here cannot relate to the plight of some teachers in the USA. The recent protests and walkouts in Oklahoma as just one example.


Video source

Any teacher here worried about paying for parking or spotty wifi access at the periphery of a large campus needs some perspective. The video immediately above provides some.


http://edublogawards.com/files/2012/11/finalistlifetime-1lds82x.png
http://edublogawards.com/2010awards/best-elearning-corporate-education-edublog-2010/

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