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Posts Tagged ‘replacement

I was one of many owners affected by the iPhone slowdown due to drained batteries. I wondered how to get a new battery with the minimum of fuss.

I could have visited a reputable phone repair shop and the battery alone would cost about SGD65. The price was accurate as of Nov 2017 and I know this because I replaced my son’s iPhone battery then.

However, Apple now offers a SGD38 battery replacement. I took advantage of this official but cheaper option and I share my experience below.

made an appointment online using my iCloud credentials. The batteries are limited so the appointments are critical to avoid disappointment. Once online, I got to select the date, time, and battery service provider. Note:

  • As there was a high demand for replacement batteries, I was only able to fix an appointment a week later.
  • The appointment calendar only spans a week. If there are no slots left that week, you will have to try the next day for another day’s slots to open up.
  • It is probably best to select a battery service provider closest to your home or work place. This will cut down on travel time and cost.

After I booked the appointment online, I received an onscreen and email confirmation. Both contained the Case ID number.

iPhone battery service reservation.

To prepare my phone for servicing, I had to:

  1. Deactivate Find My iPhone.
  2. Sign out of iCloud services completely.
  3. Reset the iPhone completely (Settings -> General -> Reset All Settings).
  4. Remove any and all non-out-of-the-box Apple add-ons, e.g., phone case.

Addendum: Remove the phone’s SIM card before you hand it over. I did not have to do this as the phone I serviced was a spare one and did not have its own SIM card.

I brought the iPhone to the service provider at the appointment time. My provider had a self-service queue system which required me to type in the last six digits of my Case ID number.

I had a morning appointment on a week day, so there were very few people about. I waited for about a minute and was called to the counter.

The service representative did a diagnosis of the phone to confirm the almost dead battery. I did this previously with the help of this app (the iPhone’s battery had dropped to 17% of its original charging capacity).

Battery capacity.

There was the usual form filling on an iPad, and in the case of my provider, the unusual signing of the form three times — one for personal information, one for the service, and one for terms and conditions.

The diagnosis and administrative work took just under 15 minutes.

The official battery replacement time was two hours. I left my contact number to be notified when the phone was ready for collection.

I received email notification that my phone was ready for collection about 1h 15min after I left the service centre. Strangely enough, the SMS notification arrived almost 15 minutes after the email.

I returned to the service centre, collected the phone, and made payment of SGD38 with my credit card. There was no extra service fee for my out-of-warranty iPhone because of Apple’s provision.

According to the terms and conditions, I have 90 days to see if the new battery works properly. So far so good.

One final recommendation: Do not make a fuss with a service representative if you do not do your homework. One older gent at the service centre raised his voice. He was at another counter before me and still there after I left. No amount of shouting and complaining is going to make repair faster.

The process getting my iPhone battery replaced was quite painless because I did my homework: Make an appointment online and prepare the phone. I also said good day and thank you.

The last weekend saw a “big read” from TODAYonline with the ominous tagline, What the demographic ‘time bomb’ spells for Singapore’s education system.
 

 
What is our demographic ‘time bomb’? An aging population due to couples having fewer children. This is not news as Singapore has had one lowest replacement birth rates in the world.

To oversimplify a complex issue, this is the line of thought that binds several paragraphs or pages: Our falling replacement birth rate led to reduced enrolments in school, and schools were merged to optimise resources. Fewer children born, fewer schools needed.

According to the news article, observers and experts suggested centralisation of programmes and co-curricular activities so that kids could pursue their interests even as those items were labelled extraneous in shrinking schools.

The same observers and experts also revisited reduced class sizes so that schools would maintain similar numbers of classes and keep as many teachers as possible.

The centralisation has already started, but as I have argued previously [1] [2] [3], the class size issue will not be taken seriously yet.

Part of the resistance to the class size issue is the unwillingness to operate outside the box or the blindness to possibilities. Both stem from the fact that the problem and solutions have a largely administrative foundation. They start with student-teacher ratios (or pupil-teacher ratios, PTRs, as our Ministry of Education calls it).

A social issue as complex as a declining replacement birth rate is complex and has far-reaching consequences. It cannot be solved with a spreadsheet mentality. The social issue needs needs multiple social approaches.

In the schooling front, we need to also change qualitative issues like changing mindsets, expectations, evaluation, and pedagogy. Mindsets like kids should be siloed by age and ability. Expectations that there should be only one teacher in the room. Evaluations that stop at conventional assessment, i.e., tests and projects. Pedagogy that is defined largely by textbooks and fixed or approved curricula.

Each of these elements is complex in itself and cannot be reduced to numbers on a spreadsheet. Collectively, changing all these elements can diffuse the so-called time-bomb and turn it into an opportunity to transform our schooling system into a truly educational one [examples].

Simply put, when the factory model stops working because you no longer have enough workers, it is time to think of boutique approaches.


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