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Posts Tagged ‘questions

This timely tweet reminded me to ask some questions.

Other than “learning styles”, are career guidance programmes here going to keep wasting taxpayer money on Myers-Briggs tests for students and the same training for teachers?

Are people who claim to be edtech, change, or thought leaders still going to talk about “21st century competencies” and “disruption” this decade?

Might people keep confusing “computational thinking” or “authoring with HTML” with “coding”?

Will administrators and policymakers lie low in the protection and regulation of the privacy and data rights of students?

Are vendors going to keep using “personalised learning” and “analytics” as catch-all terms to confuse and convince administrators and policymakers?

Are sellers of “interactive” white boards still going to sell these white elephants?

Are proponents of clickers going to keep promoting their use as innovative pedagogy instead of actually facilitating active learning experiences?

I borrow from the tweet and say: Please don’t. I extend this call by pointing out that if these stakeholders do not change tact, they will do more harm than good to learners in the long run.


Video source

This was the final episode of the the CrashCourse series on artificial intelligence (AI). It focused on the future of AI.

Instead of making firm predictions, the narrator opted to describe how far AI development has come and how much further it could go. He used self-driving cars as an example.

Five levels or milestones of self-driving AI.

Viewed this way, the development of AI is gauged on general milestones instead of specific states.

The narrator warned us that the AI of popular culture was still the work of science fiction as it had not reached the level of artificial general intelligence.

His conclusion was as expected: AI has lots of potential and risks. The fact that AI will likely evolve faster than the lay person’s understanding of it is a barrier to realising potential and mitigating risks.

Whether we develop AI or manage its risks, the narrator suggested some questions to ask when a company or government rolls out AI initiatives.

Questions about new AI initiatives.

I thoroughly enjoyed this 20-part series on AI. It provided important theoretical concepts that gave me more insights into the ideas that were mentioned in the new YouTube Original series, The Age of AI. Watching both series kept me informed and raised important questions for my next phase of learning.

A few days ago, I had more questions than answers on the latest round of PISA results.

In reference to Singapore dropping to number 2 in the overall ranking, I wondered: How about being number 10 in academics? How about striving for measures that actually mean something? How about not playing the game of rankings and comparison?

I found some indirect answers from narratives of our students’ fear of failure. We are still number 1 in that respect — 78% of our students saw failure negatively impacting their futures compared to 54% of OECD member country average.

The same article hinted at why we needed to “become less allergic to failure” but did not say how. If we collectively work on how, we might answer all three of my questions. A drop in academic rankings would not matter if we focus on curing our crippling national condition.

I also chanced upon an unexpected source of answers from a researcher in Australia.

She reasoned how PISA is not a predictive tool, so we should not have knee jerk reactions (like crafting policy) to PISA results.

She also reminded me that the tests are simply that. Even though the PISA questions have evolved, they remain a very specific set of knowledge and skills. We need to ask ourselves if we want excellent test-takers or wise risk-takers.

 
I have been an independent consultant for five years. I will be sharing unsolicited advice to anyone who wishes to leave conventional employment to be an independent worker.

The five question sets I will address next week are:

  1. Do you need to take care of anyone other than yourself?
  2. What is your backup plan?
  3. How comfortable are you with discomfort?
  4. What is in your portfolio, where is it, and how do people find it/you?
  5. Why do you want to do this?

I am sure that folks with aspirations to work independently will have a host of other questions.

I focus on this set in part to consolidate my experiences. I also know from page hits and feedback how a shared resource can have impact years down the road.

Ah, screen time. Parents want to know how much time is too much, armchair experts offer numbers, and much of the mainstream media perpetuates ignorance around the issue [examples in this video segment].

When will the fear-mongering stop? If the constant refrain from the Pessimists Archive podcast is correct, the answer is that it will not. We take comfort in what is old and fear what is new.

But there are ways to break out of the fear and inertia. One way is to ask better questions.

The easy but wrong question to ask is: How much screen time should I limit my child/student to? There is no magic number because every person is different and a number (if it even exists) depends on the context. The context begs other queries, e.g., when/where to use, what is the screen use for, why it is used.
 

 
Consider scenario A. A person is watching a video on a mobile phone while waiting to cross the road and continues watching while crossing. If you stick to the how much screen time question, my answer is zero if you value that person’s life.

Now switch the context to scenario B. The same person watches the video while travelling to work on the train. I say watch as much as your ride, data plan, wallet, or sanity allows.

Let us consider social learning contexts next.

In scenario C, a group of students decides to meet at a neighbourhood McDonald’s to discuss a class project. They need their phones to fact check, but they get distracted with memes. How much screen time should they have? How is contextual use important?

In scenario D, the same group meets online to collaboratively build a world in Minecraft. This is part of their project on climate change. Again, how much screen time should they have? How is contextual use more important?
 

 
It can take hours to edit one YouTube video. You might be able to watch one hundred videos in the same time if you go down a YouTube rabbit hole. The quantity of time is the same, but the quality of the tasks are different.

If we learn to stop asking the how much question and focus on the how, what, where, or why questions, we learn to empathise with our children and students.

That is my rant. Now here is a real ranter’s rant.


Video source


Video source

Kyle Hill of Because Science was asked (at the 21min 40 sec mark): What is the thing you are most glad you learnt (or learned in US English)?

I was so struck by that question that I paused the video and drafted this reflection before I continued watching the video.

Hill had his answer and I have mine. I am glad that I learnt to question and to ask questions.

Schooling taught me not to question, or if I had to, to ask only safe questions. It was when I pursued postgraduate degrees that I learnt most to question what I had been taught and to ask good questions.

I was not taught to question nor was I taught strategies for questioning. Instead I observed more seasoned others in the form of professors and peers. It probably helped that I was in a different country where questioning and questions were the norm.

My regret is that I have spent only about half of my 30 years as a teacher and educator encouraging my learners to question. Questioning is one of the best ways to learn and I endeavour to work on my pedagogy of questions.

If you seek to indoctrinate, provide the answers. If you seek to educate, provide questions.

The truth hurts. This is why we need to teach students not just answers but also how to ask questions.

Not any type of questions though. Good questions [examples] like those that seek to clarify, reason, and critique.


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