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Posts Tagged ‘q&a

Yesterday I shared some visual design considerations I take for my talks. Today I focus on interaction design.

My latest effort is a step down from what I normally do. I am designing for lower grade interaction by leaving out a backchannel throughout the session and one-minute paper at the end.

I am doing this because I understand my overseas audience. It is a place I have been invited to every year since 2013 and the mobile connection is unpredictable. It is not that they are unresponsive; they just cannot reliably connect to the Internet.

That said, I am still relying on two online tools that require low bandwidth from the participants.

My go-to presentation platform is Google Slides because it is free, flexible, and online. I can edit the content up to the last minute and share the slides with my audience.


Video source

In terms of interaction, I intend to try Google Slide’s “new” Q&A tool since I am not relying on my preferred tool, TodaysMeet. The audience can participate by suggesting and ranking questions.

I will also use Google Form’s quiz and auto-grading feature (similar to Flubaroo). I will create this experience for my participant as an introduction to being information literate and to establish the themes of my session.

Mobile access to online quiz and themes of my session.

I anticipate that most participants will be armed with their own phones and this will also be message about leveraging on BYOD and personal forms of learning.

Most talks seem to focus on the talk. I plan mine with lessons from educational psychology and visual design principles. I try to focus on listening as I talk in order to change minds. This is effort that often goes unappreciated, but I know that it matters.

Over the last two weeks, I had the privilege of conducting two workshops for groups of motivated instructors from a local institute of higher learning.

As usual, they had a slew of questions. While I think I was able to address some of them during the workshops, there were others that were submitted to me via a Google Form that I did not get to. This is my attempt to answer those questions.

How to measure the effectiveness of flip classroom teaching & learning?

You might be tempted to say test the learners. I say let us not feed the test machine because it is fat, lazy, and greedy. Tests are not necessarily the standard for the effectiveness of flipping.

This question is also about two aspects: Teaching and learning. Teaching does not necessarily lead to learning. Ideally this is the case in the flipped classroom (which focuses on the teacher’s efforts); this is not necessarily the case in flipped learning (which focuses on the learners’ efforts).

However, to get a measure of effectiveness of both the flipped classroom and flipped, learning, you might consider:

  • increased attendance (reduced truancy);
  • increased motivation or interest in a subject;
  • more critical and creative thinking, and better attitudes.

In other words, I recommend operating outside the test box because flipping is an opportunity to do things differently.


How do we assess whether students are able to grasp the particular learning outcome from flipped classroom learning?

If you have academic outcomes that need to be addressed, you might approach this the same way as non-flipped courses. You could do this as long as those approaches do not undermine the flipping efforts.

For example, no or low stakes quizzes might be fine if you design them for formative assessment and just-in-time teaching. But if you and your students only need to prepare for a single major test, then both of you will rationalize that everything else is not important. You will then focus only on the test results.

Instead, design for formative feedback and measures of change in attitudes, behaviours, and performance. This might involve the inputs and approval of administrators and policymakers, and this is how flipping can be a strategic key element in systemic change.


If a student did not read or prepare the materials in advance (regardless of reasons), how can facilitaton be continued when the class meets

and

How to avoid re-teaching the “flipped content” when learners come back to class unprepared (not read or viewed or attempted pre-lesson activities)

and

How to motivate students to do flipped learning when they want to be spoon fed all the time?

Reduce the urge to re-deliver content; it is the students’ responsibility to consume content outside class in a flipped classroom. If you re-deliver, you undo your efforts to flip and undermine the efforts of the students who did their part.

Instead you could:

  1. apply social pressure by not repeating the content;
  2. not punish students who had legitimate reasons for not consuming content beforehand by creating a learning station or corner for that purpose;
  3. design for flipped learning (make the learner the content creator and teacher) instead of relying on the flipped classroom model.

Flipping requires that you starve an old and irrelevant monster. Feed it and it will gain strength and take control again.


Is flipped learning suitable for Year 1 Sem 1 students (freshie)?

The flipped classroom and flipped learning is not dependent on age, ability, or aptitude. It is up to the creativity and care of the teacher who flips his or her classroom. Anyone can and should create and teach content, and that is why teachers should flip the learning.


When a group of students have prepared the content and they are presenting, how to get the other students interested in their presentation?

This is not just an issue of the flipped classroom. You cannot make anyone interested in something they have no stake in. So create that sense of ownership and give it to them. How you do this is a function of your experience, creativity, and care for your learners.


How to design flipped learning effectively if my class consists of students of diverse learning abilities/motivation?

The method I modelled was to use station-based learning. The stations were pitched at different levels and needs, but were designed with the same learning outcomes.

Another important method is projects where students learn by creating content and teaching based on where they are at and with something they can relate to.


What motivations are there for students to look at the materials outside of their official classroom hours?

If they have no stake or interest in it, frankly none. You are asking them to watch, read, or listen to your content or your interest. That is a function of teaching.

Focusing on the learner and learning is about figuring out what makes our students tick. Instead of answers, I ask some questions in return:

  • What makes them gravitate towards YouTube videos?
  • Why do they want to spend time on certain forms of social media?
  • How to they get the energy to pursue their passions?

Today is my last day as a faculty member of NIE. I will no longer be able to use my business cards other than as an image for this blog entry or a building material for a house of cards.

nie_card
I get asked the same questions about my departure, so I present them along with my answers. If I am short of time or do not want to talk to someone, I can refer them to my blog or ask them to Google it.

Actually, no. The frequently asked questions and my repeated answers are more concise here. It will take you all of one minute to read (or zero time to ignore) as opposed to having an hour-long conversation with me.

Why are you leaving NIE?
You must be new to my blog. I outlined the push and pull factors in May.

What are you going to do next?
I am giving myself a well-earned break first. I have been working full tilt over the last few years without a real and proper break, so I need to remind myself what the smell of roses is like.

I meant: What work are you going to do next?
Answer 1: Not much. I take my rest seriously.

Answer 2: My rest involves binge learning, home repairs, and focusing on what is important, e.g., my family. It is quite a bit of work really.

Will you just answer the question?
I never just answer a question. Good questions drive learning, not answers.

That said, I will pique your curiosity further by saying that I plan on being an ETC (Education and Technology Consultant) till around the end of the year. I have already started working with schools, polytechnics, private institutions, and other organizations.

So you have not looked for another job as a lecturer, professor, or director of some group?
No, I really have not.

But I have been headhunted and courted by a few groups. It is flattering, but I have said no or concluded that the fit was not good.

Are you crazy?
A little bit.

Are you crazy?

I am not crazy. Why do you think that?
You seem to have an over-fascination with conventional work. There is more to life than that.

So you will still do something in education then?
Yes. I also want to do something TO education in whatever small way I can. If people want to pay me to do this, all the better.

Are you really leaving?
Yes. Pay attention!

I am at a loss for words. I do not know what to say.
How about you stop asking me these questions?

I just thought of one final question. Do you have any advice for me?
Yes. Change: Embrace it, ride it, manage it.

And I will see you around. I might be back to bug you sooner than you know it.


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