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Posts Tagged ‘practice

Who says that you cannot learn from tweets?

While some might seem to concentrate bile in 140 characters, the edu-Twitterverse distills wisdoms. Here are just two that I bookmarked recently.

Teaching is a social process, but that does not make it based on wishy-washy feel good ideas. Effective pedagogy is based on rigorous research and reflective practice.

Teaching Is about digging deep to figure out what is best for learners and how to improve learning. It is not about teaching the way you were taught and with your blinders on.

Thanks to my Twitter PLN, I chanced upon this tweet.

Both my immediate reaction and critical reflection was: Nope, this I don’t like.

I do not have anything against fidget spinners. I do not have anything against practice provided that it is designed based on sound principles, e.g., spaced repetition, interleaving. [1] [2] [3]

It is not enough for teachers to design with just good intent. Their decision-making and implementation must be informed by rigorous research and/or reflective practice.

One design issue discussed in Twitter was that the spinner was meant to be a timer. Spin it, then do as many sums as you can before it stops.

What if the variability of the spinning momentum (some more, some less) an issue?

Is the speed of completion the desired learning outcome?

How is the use of spinners justifiable?

What better alternatives in terms of strategies and tools are there?

I am all for starting with where the learner is at. But my caveat is that the starting point is not to pander. It is to build on prior knowledge or experience and to provide a meaningful challenge.

Teachers may feel the tug of their hearts because they love their students, but they must be led first by their heads. They must first be critically informed or they risk designing in a vacuum and establishing the wrong sort of expectations.

 
Earlier this month, @tucksoon tweeted this CNA article about fake news.

I turn the question on teachers and rephrase it slightly. Do teachers know how to spot bad theory and practice?

Do they know why they should question:

  • Learning styles?
  • Homework?
  • Assessment practices?
  • Digital distinctions?

If not, I share what I have written and curated on:

 
I get worried every time I hear that phrase right before a non-educator goes on to tell others why he or she is right.

I have heard this more often than I like, but two examples stand out.

One was at a conference where a university administrator misappropriated Bloom’s Taxonomy. That person started with “I am not a lecturer or professor, but…” and continued with “I found out about Bloom’s Taxonomy and think that all of them should use it to…”.

What was alarming was not that BT could be used as a scaffold — it is great as a guide — but that it become a procedural and step-like crutch.

Another was at a seminar where a professor started with “I do not have a teaching background nor am I aware of education research, but…” and then tried to convince the audience that the strategy worked.

What was alarming in that case was not whether the strategy was viable. It was not being able to explain why beyond metrics like improved participation.

Even more alarming was the attempt to play to the audience who were mostly from non-education backgrounds. The professor discounted the importance of theory by celebrating the low-hanging fruit of “what works” instead of raising the standards and expectations of teaching faculty.

The problem with “what works” in one context is that it does not necessarily transfer to another. That particular example was extreme because the professor had the expertise to custom-create a specific LMS-like environment around his content and preferences.

Drawing on larger learning theory, be it a form of problem-based learning or flipped learning, builds on or provides questions for that theory. It strengthens practice by providing theory as structure for critical reflection and improvement.

Those of us in the educational arena can learn a lot from those who operate outside it. There might be legitimate statements that follow “I’m not an educator, but…”. However, there are few that have not raised my eyebrows or heckles. After all, would you get medical or legal advice from someone who said, “I’m not a doctor/lawyer, but…”?

I took both these individuals to task as nicely and politely as I could. I did this even though I might come across as being negative. My rationale was simple: If no one was going to be the watchdog, then anyone could walk through the gate. I was not going to sit idly by.

So beware if you show me your “but”. I might just bite it.
 

The adage “practice makes perfect” is an imperfect one. There is no point practising mindlessly nor is there any actual muscle memory. Such unscientific assumptions have, unfortunately, become the basis for homework to keep kids busy or for blind drill.

We now have neurological and cognitive research that helps us understand what practice does and which kinds of practice actually help.


Video source

This TED-Ed video briefly explains how our psychomotor functions refine with practice. I fill in a few blanks based on basic biology and educational psychology.

Neurologically speaking, effective practice is due to the increased myelination of our motor neurones. This strengthens neural transmission, i.e., the signals from the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) to the peripheral nervous system (nerves connected to muscles).

Cognitive science has also unlocked secrets on what makes for effective practice. Such practice is consistent and focused to target at weakness or what is “at the edge” of current abilities.

While drills might focus on what you are already competent at, cognitive science suggests that we concentrate on what is just outside our zone of proximal development.

The video focused largely on psychomotor skills and did not dwell on social aspects of cognition or construction. These are just as important, and arguably more so, in the contexts of learning languages, negotiating cultures, or establishing schema and mindsets.

We have much to learn about how and why we learn. The worst thing we can do is ignore good research and listen only to unquestioned tradition.

The unstated theme for this tweet is foresight.

Foresight is the difference between a good lesson plan and a bad one.

Foresight might also distinguish a good leader from a bad one.

The good news about foresight is that it does not have to be something you are born with. You can develop it by sharpening your mind almost like you would sharpen pencils. It stems from the practice of trying to see something interesting in the mundane.

There are a few of my blog entries that seem to get hits every day even though they are a few years old. One of them is “Alternative to ‘best’ practices?“.

That particular reflection was a series of a few. To provide some context, I am listing my thoughts on this contentious issue in today’s entry.

  1. 15 Sep 2012: There is no BEST practice (Contexts may not transfer)
  2. 17 Sep 2012: Alternative to “best” practices? (Contexts are different; best implies there is no need to get even better)
  3. 22 Jul 2014: Can practices be transmitted? (There is signal loss; not all signals are relevant or timely)
  4. 24 Sep 2014: Be wary of “best practices”: Slides 5-9 (Best for whom? Have you considered all contexts?)

 

Just Beware by MTSOfan, on Flickr
Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License   by  MTSOfan 

 
I was not the first to write against “best practices” and I will not be the last. Here are a few other bloggers or authors who have been more articulate than me with their thoughts about this issue.

  1. The Sham of Best Practices by Larry Cuban
  2. Why Best Practices Don’t Work for Knowledge Work by Luis Suarez
  3. On Best Practices by Shelley Blake-Plock
  4. “Best Practice”—The Enemy of Better Teaching by Bradley Ermeling, James Hiebert, and Ronald Gallimore

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