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Posts Tagged ‘new

No, this is not about the Frozen theme song.

The hardest part of learning something new is not embracing new ideas, but letting go of old ones. -- Todd Rose

I found this simple but elegant quote by wading into my Twitter stream yesterday.

I am tempted to incorporate it as a final slide for my keynote this morning. It sends a parting message not to overload ourselves when managing change: If you take, you must also let go. It is also a reminder that past habits often get in the way.

Here are the sources for my image quote. I Googled the tweet and found the original by author Todd Rose.

I used my favourite Creative Commons image search engine, ImageCodr, to look for “letting go” and found the image below. I imported and edited it in Google Slides.
 

Instead of wishing people a happy Chinese New Year, I make it a point, at least in writing, to remind folks that it is a Lunar New Year. Yeah, I am fun to be around.

The fact is that the Lunar New Year is not restricted to a place or a race. It is not just the Chinese who celebrate it. It is based on the lunar calendar. Oh yes, I am really fun to be around.

In case anyone wants to make the case that there are other lunar calendars (yes, there are), I would point out that this one marks a new year in China and parts of Thailand, Korea, Vietnam, etc. Are we having fun yet?

So to my fellow apes who are born in the Year of the Monkey, I also remind you that a monkey is not an ape.

This photo should make you think.

But instead of seeing just the similarities between a classroom then and now, I also see a key difference.

The modern classroom should look empty because kids can learn on their mobile devices and with YouTube.

The problem is we still rely on 100-year-old strategies and bring them back into the classroom of old.

You can imagine parents telling their kids to stop playing video games and to do their homework instead.

These same parents will ignore the growing suspicion that schooling does not prepare kids for their futures but for their past instead.

They will ignore the increasingly loud rhetoric about preparing kids for jobs that do not exist yet. Watch the segment of the video last edited in 2012 and embedded below.


Video source

They will certainly ignore two things I tweeted recently about the possibility of gaming as a career and the prize money it offers.

But they ignore these at their peril and to the possible detriment to their kids because they focus on what they want instead of what the kids need or might be able to do.

Ten years ago when YouTube was born, who thought that it might be possible to live off online videos by vlogging? Who even considered vlogging as a job instead of a hobby? Who thought that vloggers might get TV shows, movie deals, merchandizing, sponsorship deals, books, tour dates, etc.?

We might not have a new economy (it is still about money), but there are new players who are rewriting the rules or making up new ones.


Video source

This RSA video suggests a few problems with attempts at systemic educational change (39sec to 1min 24sec mark). One problem is teacher professional development that provides knowledge, but does not attempt to change behaviours.

To make matters worse, only one out of four teachers in OECD countries are rewarded for trying to be innovative (1min 56 to 2min 02 sec mark).

RSA suggest we stop asking the old question of “What works?” and instead encourage teachers to ask “What might work?” To do this, teachers must be problem-owners, solution designers, and risk-takers.

What can you say in one minute? What can you teach in one minute?

Most people would say not much.

But if video is the new text, what can you say in that same minute? What can you now teach in one minute?

Here are three videos, each only a minute long, that present a wealth of possibilities.


Video source


Video source


Video source

If you are an educator, what questions can you spark so that the learning (not the teaching) goes well beyond that minute?

If students are already “reading” videos, why are we not teaching them to “write” videos?

If video is the new text, are you an educator who is literate and fluent with this text?

T minus zero normally means “out of time” or it marks the launch of a projectile.

5 seconds by lecates, on Flickr
Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 Generic License   by  lecates 

 
Today is the start of my identity sans NIE labels. No professor, no lecturer (I hate that term!), no appointment holder, no leader or manager. No unnecessary baggage either.

But I will still be doing some of those things over the next few months as I provide consulting work for various institutes: pedagogy workshops, change management experiences, strategic planning, ETC. ETC not as in et cetera, but as in Education and Technology Consultant.

I am looking forward to a more focused, relaxed, and rewarding work life. If I take one of the full time positions I have been offered, my blog readers will be among the first to know.


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