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Posts Tagged ‘long

There is a lesson from Pokémon Go that could be applied to teacher professional development and the design of learning experiences for students. It is learning to play the long game.

The long game is favouring long-term results and rewards over instant gratification and short-term gain. Here are three long game strategies in Pokémon Go.

The first is levelling up by accumulating XP (experience points).

One way of doing this is by catching mundane Pokémon like Pidgeys, Rattatas, and Weedles. These creatures are common and easy to catch. Catch them, convert them to candy by transferring them to the Professor, feed that candy to stronger versions of their own kind, and evolve them to the next stage. This results in quick bumps in XP.

The learning by teachers and students should also be about getting more experiences. Like Pokémon Go, these life experiences should take place outside the classroom. Instead of the mundane Pokémon, they should be going for variety. But leave out the candy-cannibalism, please!

The higher your XP in Pokémon Go, the better the Pokémon you tend to find. The more experiences you have in life, the better equipped you are to handle what comes your way.

The second long game strategy is trimming the fat.

This means discarding what you do not need from both your bag of items (initial limit 350) and Pokémon storage (initial limit 250). Not clearing items out not only leads to clutter, it also prevents the inclusion of newer items, e.g., higher CP wild Pokémon or more Poké balls.

Clearing items like healing sprays and raspberries might seem counterintuitive because they are supposed to help. But these help only if you use them regularly. If not, hoarding them is like hanging on to medicines and encyclopaedias that you do not use.

Both teachers and students need not hoard information and artefacts just in case. It is a discipline to decide what you need and what you do not. Teachers and students need to realise that the brain is designed to forget and that we operate largely on just in time.

The third long game strategy is battling in gyms every 20 hours or so in order to get free Poké coins.

If you are quick after a successful battle, you might claim a place in a Pokémon gym. Doing this gives you a 10-coin reward at the shop. Accumulate enough coins and you can buy something from the shop without using a credit card.

This is like saving a little bit of one’s allowance every week or one’s salary every month. The drops might take a while to fill the bucket, but the reward is that much sweeter when you enjoy it.

We do not learn from experiences. We learn from reflecting on experiences. -- John Dewey.

People might think of incorporating Pokémon Go to teach content. You can. But I would rather use it to teach values like appreciating diversity, consistency and discipline, as well as persistence and patience.

This is about learning with and from the game without realising that you are learning. That is both a strength and weakness of this form of game-based learning.

It is a strength because the learning is experiential and emotional. It is a weakness because the takeaways might not be obvious. Both teachers and students need to reflect and transfer.

Today I would like to share three lessons on change management that one might draw from a utility bill.

It may sound strange, but there is one monthly bill I almost look forward to receiving every month. This is my utility bill for electricity, water, and gas.

I do not actually look forward to paying money. I like seeing the comparison table that I get via an e-bill.

utility_bill

This is my August summary. I take some pride that despite having a large apartment, I use comparatively little by way of utilities. The asterisks refer to comparisons with other apartments in my building and the national average based on the size of my apartment.

My household keeps our electricity bill low by using LED bulbs, using energy efficient appliances, rarely using the air-conditioner, and having devices that switch standby devices totally off. I am also a tyrant about electricity discipline.

We keep water waste to a minimum by having low-flow taps and adjusting the WC flow to its most efficient. I am not sure what we do with gas except that it is sometimes more efficient to microwave small amounts of water than to heat it over a stove. It boils down to good personal habits.

I have invested the most time, money, and effort in saving electricity because that is what I have the greatest control over and there are a variety of devices and processes at home that use it.

I have not changed any major appliance since I bought them almost a decade ago, but I got the most energy efficient ones I could then. I put the computing devices on power schedules so they do not run when we are not using them.

 
I initially had CFL lights (which were energy savers) but changed my often used lights to LEDs (which use even less electricity) despite the high initial cost. I also invested in two devices that prevent standby devices from using electricity (IntelliPlug by OneClick, exact model here).

I found out as much as I could about these devices, tried a few, monitored the results, and bought more when they seemed to be working.

The savings paid off almost immediately. Each month, I get reminded that what I started keeps working. When there are utility hikes, I do not see appreciable jumps.

So what are the lessons that might be scaled up and applied to change management?

First, it is important to invest in the long term. The short term might involve cost (money, time, effort, manpower, etc.) with no clear results for months or even years. But if you have a well-researched and/or proven strategy, you can be confident that it will pay off in the longer term.

Second, you must monitor the effects of change implementation. You must have a constant source of data to let you know that what you are doing is working or not. Objectively collected and analyzed data that yields good results is a morale booster and motivates change agents to keep pushing forward. Data that consistently points the other way is a clear sign to try something else.

Third, keep at it even when things are going well. The worst thing that can happen is to get complacent. Every process can be more efficient or more effective or something can come along to threaten a time-tried technique. It is important to stick to your guns when things do not seem to be going well or know when to switch tactics even if they are.

If you are ahead of the curve, your biggest competitor is yourself. If you want to keep staying ahead, keep establishing new long term goals, monitor your progress, and embrace constant change.


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