Another dot in the blogosphere?

Posts Tagged ‘experience

No, it is not a new word. I call a mobile app experience, particularly a bad one, an apps-perience.

I share some thoughts on using a commercial app by McCafe in Singapore. I hope to illustrate how edu app designers might learn from the negative examples McCafe has generously offered.

I provide screenshots from an iOS and Android phone because I used both to make sure that the experience was consistent. It was consistently bad.

Lesson 1: Bare-essentials registration
Most apps require user registration. The McCafe app requires your name, gender, full date of birth, email address, and phone number. As it only requires your phone number to tie the app to you and to send an SMS verification, this is the only data it actually needs.

It collects more information than it requires and this tells you that it wants your data for more than just providing you with a good deal. You are the deal for McDonald’s and its third party allies.

If you use this app, be sure to deselect all the options under the Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA) section. If you are lonely and like spam, select them all.

Part of the McCafe app registration process.

The registration process feels unnecessarily long, burdensome, and intrusive because of the amount and type of information it seeks. For example, it could have left out the date of birth details while including the age declaration option. After all, there was no way to verify a user’s age.

For that matter, there was no way to check the user’s name, gender, or email. If establishing identity is the purpose of registration, the phone number is enough. After all, our phone numbers are already tied to our identities when we sign up for mobile subscriptions.

The lesson for edu apps designers is the same. Respect the privacy of the user. If an edu user has an institutional ID number or email address, use just that. If not, get the bare minimum, e.g., email address, for setting up and verifying an account.

Lesson 2: Do not nag
When I start the app on iOS, I get this reminder. I cannot deactivate it unless I let the app notify me and allow it to track my location.

Nagging reminders by the McCafe app.

I choose to allow neither. All other apps I use stop nagging me once I choose no. This screen does not provide a “no” option and appears each time I launch the app. You can imagine how much joy this brings me. Not.

Lesson for edu apps designers: Reminders can be important, e.g., project deadlines, and you should give the user a choice to be reminded or not. If so, the type of reminder should also be an option. These reminders can be built into the OS, e.g., app badge, notification area, slider, or popup. Alternatives to these might be a reminder feed to a calendar, email, or messaging app.

Lesson 3: Mind your language
After the nag screen, I get this warning message (see screenshot below). This is two unwanted reminders to tap on before I can start using the app.

The McCafe app thinks that my iPhone is jailbroken — the app prefers jailborken — even though it is not.

The McCafe app thinks my phone is

The only good thing about this message is that I get a chuckle every time I see it.

Maybe the app developer has Scandinavian roots. Maybe there is a sneaky collaboration with IKEA for new line of toddler barriers, Jaīlbørkën. You heard it here first.

Lesson for edu app designers: You might not be providing an English learning experience, but if that is the language of the app, use it properly. No “borken” English, please.

Lesson 4: Put the user experience first
This lesson is hard to describe with a screenshot because it is the process of using the app to 1) claim stamps (five add up to a free drink) or 2) use coupons. Both use a QR code system that appears on the user’s screen.

The process seems simple enough. Pull up a QR code that identifies you or the coupon, then scan it. The problem is that the setup is designed for the cashier and not the user.

Every other app interface I have used that requires a user-generated QR code allows the user to align the code to the reader. This is like tapping your EZ-link card to the reader.

However, at McCafe the reader is positioned so that you cannot see where you are aiming the QR code app; only the cashier can. I experienced this for myself and I watched people after me doing the same thing. Each time the cashier had to guide the user’s hand left or right, up or down, and forward or back.

Two-step verification of QR code in McCafe app.

This process is even more awkward when you have to use a coupon because you have to scan the QR code twice. You try to scan it the first time. You then have to tap a “Next” button on screen for another QR code to appear.

When you do this, you have to turn the screen towards you, tap the button, and start aiming again. Watching a line of people do this can be mildly amusing if it did not look so stupid.

Lesson for edu app designers: Do not make your users feel stupid or make them do stupid things. Your users have experienced other apps and quite a few of these will feel slick or even sophisticated. Those other apps are no less secure and it is no shame to learn from other app makers.

Bonus lesson
This app rant is not about getting a free cup of coffee or poking fun at a mega corporation. One cup or small pokes are not going to make a dent in a company that used to have a clown for a mascot and now aligns itself with the passé Angry Birds.

This is about learning not just from a textbook or highly theoretical principles. With keen observations and critical questions, educators can deconstruct and reconstruct lessons from everyday phenomena.

Such lessons bring fresh perspectives to old issues and are fun and meaningful to the learner. That is the most important lesson of all: It is more about the learner and learning, less about the teacher and teaching.

Last semester I wrote an open letter with the slightly more senior members of my classes in mind. I did this because I sensed their anxiety in the early part of the semester.

Instead of rewriting the letter, I reread it, and I think that what I had to say then applies this semester.

I have two “younger” classes and two “older” ones, but I hope they all get the message.

I am struck by the number of career switchers in my classes. (I know that they have valid concerns, so I am writing an open letter for all to read and respond to.)

The only other time this happened to me was when I was teaching the ICT course in the late 90s in the Bukit Timah campus. This was after an economic downturn and MOE recruited lots of career switchers. I recall being able to count on one hand the number of fresh grads in some classes!

I post this because I sense a common worry among the more senior teacher trainees. They wonder if they can keep up. They fear the technology learning curve. They worry that being out of school for so many years will somehow hold them back.

I say worry and fear not. I have often found the senior trainess to have as much energy as their younger counterparts (you are only as old as you feel!). The technologies, while they evolve very quickly, are much easier to learn than before. You also do not have to learn EVERYTHING. But it helps to have a mindset that you will need to continue learning as a teacher.

Having work experience outside the educational arena is not a disadvantage. You should have some people skills, time and self management, and a certain level of maturity. It’s not just what you do but how you do it. It’s not just what you know but also who you know.You get the picture!

But don’t let experience hold you back either. It can be a wall that you hide behind. Many teachers are guilty of doing this because they adopt or find a formula and stick with it. But this is irresponsible behaviour because we do not improve our practice if we are content with the status quo. I should add that it is equally irresponsible just to use technology for its own sake (I call this falling into the “cool tool” trap).

Let your experience be one factor when you are trying to decide if a venture (such as technology integration) is worthwhile. Let experience work in your favour as you take classes in NIE. But let it not become a crutch that you lean on.

There is much to learn and you owe it to your students to do this.


http://edublogawards.com/files/2012/11/finalistlifetime-1lds82x.png
http://edublogawards.com/2010awards/best-elearning-corporate-education-edublog-2010/

Click to see all the nominees!

QR code


Get a mobile QR code app to figure out what this means!

My tweets

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Archives

Usage policy

%d bloggers like this: