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Posts Tagged ‘drone

The video embedded in the tweet below went viral recently.


Video source

Educators would readily repeat the message of grit or persistence or resilience.

I was about to add to the chant by pointing out that the life lesson was not foreseen, planned, or scaffolded. This does not help teachers who operate by standards, curriculum, or otherwise being told what to do.

As I hesitated on clicking the publish button in WordPress, this Atlantic news article provided insights on why the mother bear and her cub made such a desperate dash. They were startled by an aerial drone that sought to capture footage.

The lesson about struggling and failing to learn about grit and persistence is important, but it is the obvious and low-hanging fruit. The bears would have been put in that danger had the documentarians operated more ethically. Therein lies an equally important but less obvious lesson.


Video source

Drop the skepticism that this is a public relations exercise by Coke.

Put on the lenses that let you see that some of us do care and find small ways to show we care. Sometimes these actions are obvious, sometimes they are not.

Watching the video reminds me of one of Coca Cola’s (old?) slogans: Have a Coke and a smile. The Singapore Kindness Movement and Coke put smiles on the faces of our invisible workers. The video put a smile on mine.

Thank you, Coke. Thank you, people who got behind this effort by the Singapore Kindness Movement.

Thank you, invisible workers, for the roof over my head, the floor beneath my feet, and the walls around me that allow me to call my house a home.

We don’t often think of video game experience as being an asset for the working world. I have read of a few people mentioning how gaming experience might be part of resumes [example], but here is a story of how playing games led to a job for one 18-year-old.

Amy Goodman interviewed P.W. Singer, a former defense policy adviser to President Obama’s election campaign and author of Wired For War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century. The interview is long and here is the juicy bit.

AMY GOODMAN: The relationship with games? You write that the best pilot is an eighteen-year-old kid who trained on an [Xbox] video game?

P.W. SINGER: Pretty much. It’s a sort of fascinating story of—

AMY GOODMAN: Xbox.

P.W. SINGER: Yeah. He was actually a high school dropout who wanted to join the military to make his father proud. He wanted to be a helicopter mechanic. And they said, “Well, you failed your high school English course, so you’re not qualified to be a mechanic. But would you like to be a drone pilot?” And he said, “Sure.” And it turned out, because of playing on video games, he was already good at it. He was naturally trained up. And he turned out to be so good that they brought him back from Iraq and made him an instructor in the training academy, even though he’s an enlisted man and he’s still—he was nineteen.

And the fascinating thing is, you go, “That’s an interesting story.” You tell that story to someone in the Air Force, like an F-15 pilot, and they go, “I do not like where this is headed. You know, I’ve got a college education. The military spent $5 million training me up. And you’re telling me that this kid, this nineteen-year-old—and, oh, by the way, he’s in the Army—is doing more than I am?” And that’s the reality of it.


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