Another dot in the blogosphere?

Posts Tagged ‘different

I am thankful that LNY reunion dinners take place once a year. Let me qualify that statement: I am thankful they take place ONLY once a year.

I could elaborate on some things not to like about them, e.g., the unsolicited advice, the borderline (or outright) insulting comments, inane conversations that go nowhere, etc. I am sure some people can relate, so I will not say more.

But here is something that only a minority might identify with — thanks to food allergies and being left-handed, I cannot enjoy the food.

When I was younger, I recall battling servers who would move my chopsticks back to the right side after I placed them on the left. I also battled elbows with the right-hander seated to my left as we ate.

I still battle right-handers seated to my left, but servers are not as passive-aggressive today. They are look at me in a funny way… like I was a three-legged puppy, for instance.

Now all this is assuming that I get to eat because I get ill if I consume molluscs or crustaceans. Every year I get reminded how I am such a “poor thing”. Every year I forget to eat my dinner before dinner so that I am not starving after a four-hour meal.

I am reminded at this time of year that I am different. I do not mind being different except that others sometimes have a problem with that. It is as if I chose not to be right-handed and deliberately became allergic to some food.

These yearly reminders are unpleasant because they are put on display. These reminders of being different are not for celebration and not to be celebrated.

But I am happy to be different, as everyone should be. That is what makes each of us special and what provides some value to the rest.

I am happy to provide alternative or even unpopular points of view in the broad field of educational technology. I know that my perspective is valuable and I can back up what I say.

I hit from left field and I am allergic to the ignorant, the inane, and the inertia.

I am recreating some of my favourite image quotes I created some time ago. This time I use Pablo by Buffer and indicate attribution and CC license.

Doing things differently does not always mean doing things better. But doing things better always means doing things differently. -- Hank McKinnell

This quote addresses at least two things: 1) Change for its own sake, and 2) what it means to be truly innovative.

Doing things differently — like using an “interactive” white board to lecture — does not make things better. This is change for its own sake or because of the heavy financial investment in white elephant technology.

To innovate is to do things better. Some say innovations can be either iterative (doing the same things differently) or disruptive (doing different things). The second half of the quote reminds us that when leveraging on technology, better is accompanied by different. Separate the two and you are not likely to innovate.

Note: I am on vacation with my family. However, I am keeping up my blog-reflection-a-day habit by scheduling a thought a day. I hope this shows that reflections do not have to be arduous to provoke thought or seed learning.

In Singapore’s foodie culture, a crowd or queue is a sign of good eat. Following the crowd might be a good chance to take.

I read the article embedded in this tweet and was reminded why it is not always wise to do what everyone else is doing.

Microsoft’s Skype found out the hard way that following the social app crowd is not a good thing. Instead of leveraging on its strengths or developing something new, it tried mimicking Snapchat. Some users responded by giving Skype paltry ratings at app stores.

I suggest three takeaways that apply to educational technology integration, instructional design, and app development.

Do different
Going with the flow takes less effort than swimming against the current, so this might make sense in the development of curricula, course elements, and applications. However, this might be like doing the same thing as everyone else or doing the same thing differently.

Are you just delivering content and attempting to engage instead of designing to challenge and empower users? Doing the latter is more difficult, but this might be more worthwhile in the long run.

Sense accurately
According to the article, Skype Corporate VP Amritansh Raghav said that the new features of Skype were requested by users. Whether you are head of ICT or lead designer, you cannot listen only to your noisiest stakeholders because they might be a vocal minority.

You may chose to make data-informed decisions, but you need to know how accurate your sensing tools are and if the data are biased.

Needs, not wants
In 1989, Steve Jobs famously declared that the user is fickle [source].

You can’t just ask customers what they want and then try to give that to them. By the time you get it built, they’ll want something new.

Jobs relied more on his intuition than market research. Since most of us are not like Jobs, what can we do?

I say we give the user — or in education, the learner — what they need, not what they want. Being learner-centred does not mean pandering to their desires. It means being focused on their needs and future, not our hangups and past.

One more thing…
The author of the article did not like the garish colour scheme of new Skype. There is an easy solution: Opt for the dark, monotone one in settings.

When I was in Denmark a few years ago, my host asked me what I learnt from travelling overseas. I gave my standard reply: For the important things, we are more alike than different.

This is a particularly important lesson in today because of the social climate and our membership as world citizens. So I was pleased to find this video from a Danish broadcaster.

Video source

The video starts with people being put in boxes. We then discover that people move out of those categories into new ones based on different contexts we put them in and the questions we ask of them.

While it is human to take cognitive shortcuts by categorisation, it is far more important to question and challenge those categories. I would wager that by asking more questions and issuing more challenges to ourselves, we learn more about others. Then we might discover that we struggle with the same issues because we have the same differences.

When this principle is applied in schooling and education, we might question if single curricula and standard assessments are logical for different learners.

…is the same word every year: Better.

Make the year better by making the place and people around me better. Be a better father, husband, educator, learner, etc. Become better by learning constantly and never being satisfied.

That is why I do not opt for “change” or “different” as my words. I seek not to change for its own sake, nor to be different (which could be better of worse).

Better is better.

Doing things differently does not always mean doing things better.  But doing things better always means doing things differently. -- Hank McKinnell (Former CEO of Pfizer)

Anyone who has a hand in designing and managing systemic change should relate to this. They should also be able to provide insights on what needs to emerge in between the lines. That is why the quote is a great conversation starter on topics like innovation or leadership.

As is my practice from this quotable quotes series, I share the sources with which I made the image quote.

The words are courtesy of this tweet.

The original photo was shared under Creative Commons.

There are not many circumstances in which doing the same thing differently is innovative. This might be one exception.

Video source

Why do I make this exception an example of innovation? The singer is obviously talented in several ways. While he has taken someone else’s song and applied the identities of others on them, he has taken enough creative license to make the mix his own.

Likewise moving from PowerPoint to Google Slides or Prezi is not innovative. But opening the Slides or Prezi for public comment or collaborative construction could be. The innovation is not in the tool or the delivery. It is in the human endeavour.

Click to see all the nominees!

QR code

Get a mobile QR code app to figure out what this means!

My tweets


Usage policy

%d bloggers like this: