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Posts Tagged ‘critical


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This video snippet from the BBC painted a positive picture of the possible effects of mobile use by babies or toddlers. It was a better clip than the CNA video last year [1] [2] not because it was tech-positive, but because it was less biased.

The CNA video last year asked the question “Can e-learning make you dumb?” and sought to back up its answers with what its writers had already decided instead of what they could investigate.

The BBC video was not as negative, even when the narrator seemed to sneak in negative associations with mobile device use like “young children sat down using technologies won’t be as good at coordinating their bodies”. It was simply repeating a commonly held concern by lay folk.

The takeaways from the video should not be that the small sample of kids was representative of a larger group nor that kids who used technology were no worse with gross motor skills and better at fine motor skills.

If we learn anything at all from these videos it should not be the opinions on the effects of e-learning or mobile devices. It should be that we need to read, listen, watch, or otherwise process all sources of information with critical filters.

One coarse but vital filter is identifying bias. The CNA video asked questions and rushed to answer them with unbalanced certainty. The BBC video, while seemingly positive, asked questions and left room for even the child expert to express doubt.

One video tried to tell you WHAT to think; the other video could teach you HOW to think.


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The video above on the best Microsoft flops reminded me of a principle that applies both in implementing innovation and managing change.

It does not matter so much if you have a better idea. It matters more if you share or do it at the right time and in the right place.

By the way, don’t feel too bad for Microsoft. It is neither micro nor soft.


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You can read the title as a cheer or a sigh.


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Yesterday I heard a promoter at mall sell disinformation. This reminded me of the claim a student teacher made years ago.

The mall charlatan proclaimed the benefits of oxygenated water and a product that would allow you to put extra oxygen in tap water.

Only aquatic organisms would benefit from an infusion of oxygen in the water. Then again only up to a point because too much oxygen is harmful whether it is in water or air. That aside, humans are terrestrial animals and we do not gain from extra-oxygenated water except perhaps for ticklish bubbles.

If we were somehow able to absorb more oxygen from water like the way we do from our red blood cells, we would oxidise chemicals in our bodies. One physically overt effect of this is premature aging, which was something contrary to the promoter’s product.

The harm of buying into this non-scientifically-based sell hurts your pocket and helps perpetuate scientific ignorance. This is bad, but not as bad as what might happen in a classroom.

A few years ago, I reflected on a student teacher who told her students that it was important to drink water because it contained oxygen. Our bodies do not electrolyse water. If we did, we would produce two highly flammable and explosive gases (hydrogen and oxygen) in our bodies.

I pointed this out to the student teacher and urged her to rectify this at the next lesson. Misteaching science initiates or perpetuates falsehoods. Disinformation takes root and becomes unfounded knowledge. If left unchecked, this condition might develop into disdain for scientific literacy and critical thinking.

We should be nurturing kids who are scientifically literate and cheering, “Yeah, Science!” But if we do not correct bad teaching or ignorant sales pitches, we leave kids who think that ignorance is bliss.

The future is already here. It's just not evenly distributed. --William Gibson

People far wiser and more articulate than me have opined and written about various divides: Income, economic, digital, social, etc.

They have a common point — we need to do better to bridge those divides so that we do not end up with the haves on one side and the have-nots on the other.

However, there is one divide that might be bridged by being on the wrong side of a divide. Just because you might be a have-not does not mean you cannot get creative. Case in point:

If we have neither the resilience nor the creativity, we are on the wrong side of the divide even though we might have all the tools, support, and money in the world.

If I was conducting a workshop on pedagogical change, I might start it by showing the video embedded in the tweet above.

Participants would invariably offer different answers to my question: What does this video have anything to do with pedagogical change?

I might then guide them to the importance of not making hasty decisions due to a lack of perspective.

It takes effort to get a new perspective. Sometimes the effort is quick and easy while other times it takes a marathon. It is easier if one is able to balance a systemic view and necessary nuance.

This is where having an outsider’s or learner’s perspective is crucial. When you are too close to a problem you often cannot see it perched right on your nose.
 

Can you teach a student to think critically?

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The video above has a persuasive answer: Not really, no. But you can model it and hope that it gets reflected to you once the learner catches on.

This is a reminder that some things (like values) are insidiously caught and not overly taught.

Values are more CAUGHT than they are TAUGHT.

Here is a critical question and a critique in the space of 280 characters.

Policymakers, administrators, and some teachers like to tout the so-called 21st century competencies. So what if we cooperate, collaborate, or communicate, particularly in superficial or inauthentic ways?

So what if all that sharing is feel-good and does no good?

Are we prepared to ask the critical and difficult questions that reveal how uncertain our answers are? Only then can we move forward instead of resting on our laurels. Only then can adults model and lead by example.


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