Another dot in the blogosphere?

Posts Tagged ‘connect

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This artist’s process video reminded me of a principle in edtech implementation.

When you are a beginner, simply understanding separate concepts seems like the neat thing to do. This might include separate elements like technology skills, pedagogical strategies, educational psychology, and content knowledge.

The consummate skill is in knowing how to combine these separate dots into a coherent whole. For example, the TPACK framework connects pedagogy, content, technology, and context. The separate concepts need to be blended and blurred into each other.

But even TPACK does not provide all the dots or help an educator connect them. Just like the artist brings other tools, techniques, and his vision to to the canvas, so too must an educator who wishes to enable learning with technology.

Call me biased, but I like featuring news and research that counters the fear-driven narratives of much of the press.


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In the video above, parents learnt how to play video games to connect with their kids. This is not the only way parents connect, but it is an important one. The strategy not only creates opportunities awareness and involvement, it showcases the kids’ abilities to teach their parents.

Another resource certain to ruffle the feathers of proverbial ostriches with heads in the sand is the NYT review of research revealing that fears about kids mobile phone and social media use are unwarranted.

Though not specially labelled in the article, the reported research sounded like meta analyses of prior research studies on mobile phone and social media use on well-being.

The meta research revealed that the effect size was negligible. On the other hand, studies that spread fear and worry tended to be correlational, e.g, the rise in suicide rates in the USA rose with the common use of mobile phones.

But the NYT reminded us that correlation is not causation. Furthermore, there was no appreciable rise in Europe even though there was a similar rise in use of mobile phones.

One reason the NYT has the reputation it has is because it resists the temptation to be reductionist or simply regurgitate what the rest report. This is not about stand out. It is about being critical and responsible.


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Traditionalists who think that kids should only read from dead tree books and not be given interactive e-books before a certain age are bound to take joy in this book by Novak.

They will call this evidence of the effectiveness of not just books but also pictureless books. Victory!

But their confidence is misplaced. There are many forms of reading: For pleasure, for work, for study; skimming or in-depth; alone or in groups; being read to or reading on your own. They are not the same thing.

For me the video is evidence of connecting with kids. You can (and should) do that with any type of book.

And if video is the new text, what other sort of reading should we be promoting? Take a minute (or three) and see.


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