Another dot in the blogosphere?

Posts Tagged ‘classic

Twenty four. That is the number of classic Google Sites that I cannot transition to new Sites. These were created by someone else and shared with me, but I do not have administrative rights to update them.

My screenshot shows 22 such sites, but there are two more that are domain-locked and not included in my list.

According to this support article, as of January 2022 “when users try to visit a classic site, they won’t see the website content.” This is Google-speak for classic Google Sites are dead, so you have to use new Google Sites.

I wish my previous collaborators would update the classic Sites to new ones. Each site takes a few clicks and about one minute to complete the whole process. It would be a shame for all that shared knowledge to be hidden because people do not know or care.

Sharing takes effort. Sometimes it involves going against institutional policy. Sometimes it is a minor inconvenience. Converting classic Google Sites to the new version is the latter. Just do it.

I am reminding myself about this old news: The sunsetting of classic Google Sites in favour of the newer version is the end of 2021.

Why the reminder? I have over 50 Google Sites: 44 are classic and 10 are current.

I am making the transition slowly to focus on the sites that I rely on regularly. But the main reason is that each move takes time and effort.

The conversions are not complete and clean. This should come as no surprise to anyone who has exported a website and transferred it to another platform. There are relatively minor issues like font changes and page permissions. But there are also major ones like non-working plug-ins and broken embedded content.

The best thing about the new and improved Google Sites is the WYSIWYG simplicity. It also uses responsive web design so I can author on a laptop and the site will automatically fit and arrange content in phone browser.

The biggest loss in the new Google Sites is page history. Google Sites have wiki architecture at its roots (I reflected on my early adoption of Sites and its precursor). Page histories are fundamental to wikis because they allow users to see what and how a page has changed over time.

This reflects one of my educational philosophies — it is important to see the processes behind a product, not just take a product at face value. In the case of learning, I am not just interested in WHAT my students might learn; I want them to know the HOW and WHY.


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