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Posts Tagged ‘box


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The gist of this episode might read: Neural networks, anyone?

Neural networks are commonplace, but we might not be aware of them. They are used when Facebook suggests tags for photos, a diagnostic lab analyses cell samples for cancer, or a bank decides whether or not to offer a loan.

So knowing what neural networks are and how they work are important. However, this episode provided only a small taste of both with this schematic.

My marked up version of the PBS/CrashCourse graphic on a basic neural network schematic.

Marked up version of the PBS/CrashCourse graphic on a neural network schematic.

If the input layer is a query we might have and the output layer is an answer, the black box is where rules and algorithms break down and process the input.

What happens in the black box is still a mystery. We might not care how exactly a social media system knows what tags to suggest for a photo, but we probably want to know why a financial system denies us a loan.

Perhaps the next episode might shed more light on the black box.

One might greet the tweet below with Futurama’s Professor Farnsworth’s utterance: Good news, everyone!

Finer user control is better than the coarse offerings in the past. However, the changes are not granular enough for me.

One YouTube channel might have many contributors. Most news organisations like CNN or MSNBC are like that. The changes in YouTube still do not allow me to favour some sources over others within each channel.
 

 
Since life is like a box of chocolates, I use that as a comparison. I like dark chocolate and I will live with milk, but I detest white. The changes to YouTube still force me to take the whole box.

When edtech vendors claim to individualise learning, we might greet such a claim with skepticism. Personalisation is not just a result of teaching-oriented algorithms; it is a function of learner empowerment.

It is one thing to advocate that we think outside the box, it is entirely another to operate outside it.

But operating outside the box does not require a total rejection of existing ideas. In the example above, thinking outside the box is operating outside the boxiness of the old design.

The improvements are that the newer map is more pleasant to the eye, easier to read, and more geographically accurate.

One might start with spreadsheet thinking and policy making, but one should not end with it unless one desires tables and charts. People and their problems are curvy, nuanced, and messy. Sometimes it does not take much to incorporate that.

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These videos are examples of thinking and operating outside the box.


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There are many ways to discourage people from using their phones while they drive. The Kiwis used humour.


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There are just as many ways to get people to obey the speed limit. These road designers used music.

Now switch gears to a child whose talent is arguably out of the box.


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This then six-year-old Japanese boy is a yo-yo master.

If he was in the Singapore schooling system, I wonder if he would still be levelling up his yo-yo skills or completing worksheets.

Are we helping kids open up their boxes? Or are we stuffing them into boxes?


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The humble cardboard box probably made it easy to hold and transport quite a few Christmas presents. They are so common that we take them for granted.

But these two reinventors have thought of a way for us to make better use of them. Their new cardboard box uses less material, is easier to pack and unpack, and can be reused by flipping it inside out.

Kind of like what good blended and e-learning should be too!


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http://edublogawards.com/2010awards/best-elearning-corporate-education-edublog-2010/

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