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Posts Tagged ‘21cc

I was at a conference last month when I tweeted this.

I was referring to a quote that caught the imagination of many a presenter. The person on stage was no exception.

This was the quote in question. It has been rendered in various forms to make the idea even more appealing.

Uber, the world’s largest taxi company, owns no vehicles. Facebook, the world’s most popular media owner, creates no content. Alibaba, the most valuable retailer, has no inventory. And Airbnb, the world’s largest accommodation provider, owns no real estate. Something interesting is happening.

Quote source: http://techcrunch.com/2015/03/03/in-the-age-of-disintermediation-the-battle-is-all-for-the-customer-interface/

Quote source: http://techcrunch.com/2015/03/03/in-the-age-of-disintermediation-the-battle-is-all-for-the-customer-interface/

Note: Images above link to sources. Original article with quote is here.

What I took issue with was a lack of attribution. The quote was bracketed up and down with the speaker’s company logo, name, and slogan. That made it seem as if he came up with the quote.

If the presentation was shared online, a link to the original quote could have allowed viewers to verify the source and authenticity of the quote.

I recalled reading the quote a while ago, so I Googled it. It was the opening paragraph of a TechCrunch article by Tom Goodwin.

I found it ironic that a speaker talking about 21st century competencies was not modelling a critical set of 21st century competencies (21CCs). It is easy to find anything on the Internet. It is harder to make sense of it, verify it, represent it, and give credit where credit is due.

You can talk 21CCs all you want, but can you walk them? Do you believe that 21CCs can only be taught or that they are also caught?

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I delivered my keynote address at De La Salle University, Dasmariñas, yesterday. I am sharing it openly here.

Many thanks to @jen_padernal for taking the photo while I was in action!

How Do We (Re)Define 21st Century Learning

I leave today for the Philippines to deliver a keynote address for De La Salle University.

I have been offering sneak peeks at a few of my slides on Twitter. I share all the sneaks here in this blog entry along with one other slide that did not make the cut.

The slide I decided not to use was the alternate cover below.

Alternate cover slide.

I referenced MOE’s 21CC “Swiss roll” in my slide deck and thought this cover might have been a cheeky nod (or not) to it. I decided against using it as my audience might not relate.

The frustration of being confused by a variety of 21CCs and models was a more likely concern. So rather than invite them to bite into a model designed for our context, I share some directions (instead of destinations) they can take.

How Do We (Re)Define 21st Century Learning

I opted to do this to illustrate the frustration and biting into something.

Some 21CCs are not unique to the 21C. Most competencies are moving targets.

My critique of most 21C models and frameworks.

The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn. — Alvin Toffler

A famous quote to lead up to a simpler, more dynamic 21C model.

Lectures then and now.

Lectures: One of several things to unlearn in the 21C.

Learn with technology the way students live with technology.

My call to relearn what it is like to learn today.

I am preparing for a keynote speech that I will deliver next week in the Philippines. I have been asked to share some thoughts about building 21st century competencies (21CCs).

My plan is to ask my audience to tell me what they think 21CCs are. I anticipate that they will provide answers that are similar to any Googleable framework. Once such framework is MOE’s “Swiss roll”.

I will not recommend that my audience bite into the roll wholly and uncritically. After all, our contexts, readiness, and mindsets might be different.

 The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.

My sources

Instead I will outline three basic approaches based on a quote from Alvin Toffler. I will then suggest what they might need to do in education by learning, unlearning, and relearning.

I am probably going to ruffle some feathers because I am straying from “model” answers. But that is what one organiser expressed as the main reason for inviting me to speak. If you are going through so much trouble to fly me over, why worry about some lost plumage? What century are we living in?

This is one of my favourites quotes. I was not sure which image to use so I created two.

The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn. -— Alvin Toffler

The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn. -— Alvin Toffler

Both capture a sense of helplessness.

The first is the person who is not 21st century literate by circumstance. The second is one who is not 21st century literate by who they are or how they choose to act.

One way to show that I am is 21st century literate is to cite my sources. These are the original images shared under Creative Commons.

Scour the Internet for “21st century learning” and you are more likely to find examples of 18th century teaching instead. Some of these examples slap technology skins over old content delivery bodies.

leap of faith by neil1877, on Flickr
Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 Generic License   by  neil1877 

 
I found a good example of what 21st century learning might look like from an unexpected source: LifeHacker.

The main points of the article were:

  • Focusing on just-in-time (JIT) learning
  • Determining your minimum effective dose (MED)
  • Prioritizing depth over breadth
  • Connecting with experienced others
  • Making learning authentic
  • Creating your own opportunities

While these examples were described in an adult learning context*, there is no reason not to apply these to other forms of learning and levels of learners.

After all, we have social, open, and mobile technologies that already allow us to do all these things. The preparatory, just-in-case schooling kids receive can be compressed or shortened to allow actual 21st century learning to happen.

*Those that prefer a K-12 perspective should read this MindShift article. Spoiler: The 21st century learning is not about futuristic technology or even pedagogy on steroids. It is about trust and digital citizenship.

I followed @sjunkins when the graphics embedded in his tweets caught my eye.

This was a recent one that educators should process critically.

Someone else on Twitter called it an infographic. It is not.

Does it have information? Yes. Does it have graphic elements that illustrate the information beyond text form, more richly, or intuitively? No. Far too many people perpetuate the wrong idea of an infographic.

The list includes some things a 21st century teacher should do. I appreciate that this is a challenge to teachers to see how connected, relevant, or current they are. But many of the items are technical skills.

These lead a teacher who might be interested in doing these things to wonder HOW to do these things. I think that it is more important to first know WHY.

I have noticed some leaders in education saying that the time is past asking why technology important. It is more important to know how. This might be true in contexts where asking why is a delay tactic among the stubborn or the undecided.

But not revisiting or emphasizing why is a mistake. I do not mean just reiterating that times have changed or that we must prepare our children for their future instead of our past.

These are all good reasons, but there should be specific reasons for wanting teachers to tweet, Instagram, lip dub, ad nauseum.

So I present an alternative list of 21 things educators might do and I suggest a reason for each.

  1. Don’t just use ICT, integrate it. If the ICT is not integrated, it is dispensible. If it is not needed, why incorporate it?
  2. Crowdsource an idea or co-author a collaboratively created lesson resource. Many hands make light work and you stand to gain ideas you would never have generated alone.
  3. Don’t just talk learner-centred, walk learner-centred. Do not tell me; show me what you can do.
  4. Make real and lasting online connections with other educators. They are your broader support system, your cheering team, and your sounding boards.
  5. Follow someone new or different on a PLN like Twitter. Get new perspectives, grow your network, help yourself by helping others.
  6. Provide a meaningful community service. Apply what you do in the real world instead of the contrived one that is often the classroom.
  7. Get inspired, be inspiring: Lead a PLN discussion, share at an unconference. One of the best ways to learn is to get out of your comfort zone. If you care, you must share.
  8. Model critical and creative thinking. More things are caught than they are taught.
  9. Overcome divides. Stop making excuses; start creating opportunities. You are either part of the problem or part of the solution.
  10. Talk less, facilitate more. Talking and teaching does not guarantee listening and learning. Get learners involved and become the meddler in the middle.
  11. Challenge your teaching philosophy. Question your assumptions. Focus on the learner and learning, not just on the teacher and teaching. It is your core and it becomes obvious to those around you.
  12. Update your e-portfolio. Focus on the processes behind the products. Curate and create as a model of a lifelong, lifewide learner.
  13. Critically reflect on your own practice. Stepping outside yourself might be the single most important attribute of an educator.
  14. Unlearn a bad habit or a bias. Deconstruct your behaviour or belief system and see what lies in the middle or at the foundation. Question if that is what you want to drive you or what you want to build on.
  15. Relearn a lost value. Reconstruct an ideal you had when you first started teaching. It can help you make that quantum leap you are looking for.
  16. Experiment with the science and hone your art of pedagogy. Think different, do different, and know why. You will not know until you try.
  17. Fail forward. FAIL = First Attempt In Learning. Do not let your first step be your last. Keep moving forward.
  18. Lead change. Do not expect someone else to show you the way. Find your own path and others may follow.
  19. Learn. Learn. Learn. An educator should be a learner first. It is the best way to understand what other learners struggle with.
  20. Play. Leverage on instinctive ways we learn. That way the learning and teaching are natural extensions of what we do.
  21. Strive to be an educator of people, not a teacher of content. If you forget WHO you are trying to change and WHY, there is no point telling them WHAT or HOW.

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