Another dot in the blogosphere?

Every generation finds something negative to say about the one that comes after it. If you want to know why, you might listen to this Pessimist Archive podcast on millennials. (Spoiler/Bait: It has something to do with land ownership.)

 
Another theme that repeats is the popularity of a medium that is enabled by the dominant technology the time.

Just over a hundred years ago, books were vilified for an instance of gun violence. Now video games have been blamed for two of the latest mass shootings in the USA.

The instances of violence are not the pattern. The blame game is.

It is easy to give in to base instincts and uncritical thinking. It is much harder to reflect and change for the better. If we do not take the difficult route, we only have ourselves to blame.

I just started following Pessimists Archive on Twitter and listening to its podcasts. Both focus on the common but irrational fear of all things new.

The Twitter feed describes itself as sharing “reactions to old things when they were new”. Consider how this reaction in 1889 is still relevant in 2019.

It is 130 years later and people are saying the same about mobile phones.

Each podcast is about 30 to 40 minutes long and is released only every one or two months. I have listed to a few episodes and I can see why they are infrequent. They lead the listener with engaging storytelling and well-researched historical bites.

I liked two audio snippets in the episode about comic books. In describing how people lament about new technologies, the narrator said that you cannot herd cats but you can move their food. This described the human condition of gravitating to comfort (the nostalgic past) and collectively opposing change (the new present or uncertain future).

But when trying to bring change, we often impose it. For example, in the episode about comic books adults declared that they took action because they were thinking of the children. But they did not ask the kids what they felt and thought.

The furore over comic books has gone and the fuss now seems like wasted effort. The worry now is with computing technologies and video games, and we might be making the same mistakes. It is easy to say we speak for a group, but have be asked and listened to them first?

We celebrate Singapore’s 54th National Day tomorrow. Kids in school, kids at heart, and kids of all ages at the ND Parade will lustily sing Stand Up For Singapore.

Perhaps we might take a moment to take a critical and humorous look at ourselves.

Perhaps we might also look for different ways to distinguish ourselves. We do not all have to be rats in the same race. We can choose our own paths and be thankful for the circumstances that allow us to do so.


Video source

Is happiness a choice? This tweet makes the answer seem like a no-brainer.

The reality is that happiness sometimes is a choice. For example, you might focus on the feel-good elements of news reports like the one below.


Video source

Whatever you choose to focus on, reality catches up. The kids in the tweeted photo and the news report will grow up to find that pure sources of happiness are rare. They need to learn to create moments of their own and to build resilience.

They might eventually learn that satisfaction is more reachable and realistic. If your best is to come in third in a race, you might not be happy but you can be satisfied with your effort. If the world tells you that your “twin sister” is not, you can be satisfied that she is your best friend.

It is difficult to process the news on the two most recent mass shootings in the USA.


Video source

It is just as difficult to read how Republican Politicians on Fox News Blame Video Games for Latest Mass Shootings.

If you understand the basics of politics there, you know how the NRA, a powerful gun lobby, has loaded guns to the heads and loaded wallets to the pockets of some politicians. So these politicians deflect blame.

What is worse is that they propagate ignorance of the facts. Facts like gun violence is a multi-pronged issue. Facts like how other countries that do not allow gun ownership but allow “violent” video games do not have as many (or even any) mass shootings.


Video source

For the record, the differences in gamers and the nature of games matter first. Politicians who seek to deflect instead of following the research and doing the right thing have their interests in mind, not anyone else’s.

The smoking gun might look like violent video games. The ones who actually help pull the trigger are cowardly and greedy people.

This is the original.


Video source

It is impressive, but out-of-date and left out countries like Singapore.

This is the remake based on that original.


Video source

The redux was not just copy and paste. A considerable amount of effort (of a different sort) went into making it.

What I shared on Saturday by citing the work of others also took effort. Other than connecting the two separate pieces, it required the ability to curate. This meant reading, evaluating, archiving, and republishing.

Here are two initial rules for anyone teaching kids about generating and sharing content. One, anything of significance is rarely unique. Two, we stand on the shoulders of giants — acknowledge them or risk getting flicked off.


Video source

Yay, here is a preview of a YouTube series on artificial intelligence and machine learning by CrashCourse.

Even more yay, it might be another resource to add to the Masters course I facilitate.

http://edublogawards.com/files/2012/11/finalistlifetime-1lds82x.png
http://edublogawards.com/2010awards/best-elearning-corporate-education-edublog-2010/

Click to see all the nominees!

QR code


Get a mobile QR code app to figure out what this means!

Archives

Usage policy

%d bloggers like this: