Another dot in the blogosphere?

Foregone conclusion?

Posted on: July 9, 2021

A recent exchange between a journalist and a ministerial panel for mitigating COVID-19 provides an example of how NOT to ask questions in education. Watch the exchange in this video segment.

The journalist had already made up her mind that the demand for the Sinovac vaccine was “overwhelming”. When this vaccine was allowed under special circumstances, the press and media featured the seemingly long queues for it outside private clinics.

These reporters did not show how the queues grew shorter as processes were refined or how the total demand for that vaccine so far (17,296 doses as of 5 July) is less than the current daily demand for the officially sanctioned mRNA vaccines (76,000 doses per day). The demand for Sinovac was not overwhelming, but this was not juicy news.

Long story made short: The reporter already had a headline and conclusion before getting more information. She asked a question with an answer in mind.

The reminder for those of us in schooling/education: Refrain from asking questions with foregone conclusions. This is not a good model for students as it is not an example of critical thinking. We need data and information before we draw conclusions, not the other way around.

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