Another dot in the blogosphere?

Administrative “creativity”

Posted on: May 27, 2021

I do not know any university educator who has not experienced this — a forced increase in class size but not recognition of increased teaching load on paper. This was true when I was a professor and is true now as an adjunct. 

“Creative” administrators seem to reverse engineer class sizes based on any metric other than learning experience. This practice has a derogatory label — spreadsheet management.

If you think that such administrators feel bad about doing this, then know this — they do not. In fact, some pat themselves on their collective backs for it. I recall administrative groups inventing awards and/or nominating themselves for awards invented by other spreadsheet managers.

The problem with such “creativity” is that it puts teaching and learning last instead of first and foremost. It does a disservice to the social responsibility of a university.

As a former appointment holder and administrator myself, I am fully aware that policy changes, budgets, and pandemics can throw a wrench into the works. But I draw the line at managing from a spreadsheet. It is impersonal, insulting, and inhuman. Do not be “creative” that way.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

http://edublogawards.com/files/2012/11/finalistlifetime-1lds82x.png
http://edublogawards.com/2010awards/best-elearning-corporate-education-edublog-2010/

Click to see all the nominees!

QR code


Get a mobile QR code app to figure out what this means!

My tweets

Archives

Usage policy

%d bloggers like this: