Another dot in the blogosphere?

Rock meets hard place

Posted on: December 22, 2017

I reflect today on what started as a Pokémon raid battle and ended up being a symbolic battle between wilful ignorance and informed decision-making.

I tweeted this a few days ago in the aftermath of an Absol raid.

Absol.

An Absol is a Pokémon that you can catch in Pokémon Go (PoGo) only in four-star level raids. This means that they cannot be caught in the wild. So when one appeared on my game’s gym radar, I made the effort to get to it.

I have since been in two Absol raid battles, but there was a common pattern to both.

Despite its rarity, the Absol does not seem to be as popular as the current legendary raid boss, Groudon. While the Groudon can attract multiple teams of 20 players each, the two Absol raids I participated in drew six and four players respectively — barely enough for narrow victories.

Groudon.

I did my homework before battling. Against an unfamiliar enemy, I got information from websites (like this), YouTube videos (like this), and the Poke Genie app.

I found out that Absol was susceptible to Pokémon that were good fighting, fairy, and bug types. I prepared a raid party to take advantage of Absol’s weaknesses.

Absol counter raid party.

At my first raid, I was one of six who cooperated to take the Absol boss down. I fought in a non-team gym and was the only one carrying my team colours. This meant I would not get the gym bonus and was unlikely to get damage bonus.

When the battle started, I noticed that my fellow battlers were using the strongest possible “brute force” Pokémon they had, e.g., legendaries like Lugia (which has psychic movesets that Absol is resistant to).

The Pokémon types and movesets might not matter very much in a group of 20, but I found out how important they were in smaller groups. I topped the damaged-inflicted list in both battles against Absol because I optimised the Pokémon types and movesets. This was despite being the unique one of six, and in my second raid, one of four in the battle group.

After the first battle, I savoured my victory quietly in a shelter nearby. However, my reflection was soon broken by a PoGo uncle arguing with a younger PoGo player. Perhaps “arguing” is the wrong word — they were just talking very loudly and kept repeating themselves.

The uncle cited what he had heard others say, what he believed in, and what always worked for him in other battles. His younger counterpart asked questions, and cited what she watched and read.

It was like Uncle Rock meeting Hard Place Girl. Neither seemed to be able to convince the other. This was a PoGo battle in which both opponents thought they were the boss, but no one was going to win.

In the end, it was a symbolic battle between wilful ignorance and informed decision-making. Both are common enough in daily life and in work. Applied in a game, wilful ignorance just hurts the player. Applied to the life and work of a teacher, for example, wilful ignorance hurts children for years to come.

It does not take playing a game like PoGo to make this realisation about wilful ignorance. It should not. But I see this still happening in our class and tutorial rooms. This strengthens my resolve to keep battling such weakness with informed decision-making in 2018. Though difficult, I am still going to try to catch ‘em all.

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