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Strategies for feedback+

Posted on: September 24, 2017

Yesterday I shared some thoughts on providing formative feedback on written assignments. Today I share some strategies I use to do so efficiently and effectively.
 

Get out of comfort zones
I try not to work at home. There are too many distractions there largely thanks to my fast Internet connection. I might get sidetracked by YouTube videos or social media alerts.

I make my way to a library or a coffee place. I do not have the comforts of home and I switch to my all-business frame of mind.

One benefit of being at a coffee place is that I cannot stay long. I cannot hog a table or I might have time-limited Internet access. The time limit is an incentive to work efficiently.
 

Block distractions
Being in a public place means it gets noisy much of the time. I counter this by donning a pair of noise-cancelling headphones.

I have different playlists to help drown out ambient noise or bad store music. Some music is calming if the work I am reviewing agitates me; some of the tunes are energetic if my human battery runs low.

I also remove my glasses as I do not need them for close up work. Doing this has the benefit of not being distracted by what appears in my peripheral vision.
 

Set a quota and stick to it
I use the number of scripts and the feedback due date to calculate how many assignments I need to process a day. Then I divide each day’s quota into a before-lunch and an after-lunch set.

The quota needs to be achievable. Some initial trial and error has built my experience up on this matter. Calculating the quota is the easy part.

The difficult part is keeping to the quota. By this I do not mean completing the AM or PM session’s amount. I do this consistently. I mean stopping when I seem to have gained momentum.

It is important to stop because I do not want to mentally exhaust myself. If I am tired, it will show in my feedback and this is not fair to my learners. I also need time to rest, play, or finish the now cold cup of coffee on the table.
 

Revisit earlier scripts
It is tempting to grade, provide feedback, and never want to see a piece of writing again. However, I find it useful to revisit earlier scripts to
to check for the consistency of my feedback.

I think that we operate like the tides when we process assignments. We seem to wash up consistently like waves crashing on a beach. But no two waves are identical and there is the overall ebb or flow of tides too.

This could be due to my energy, the time of day, the overall nature of the class, the behaviour and expectations of learners who submit at different times, and so much more.
 

Embrace subjectivity
I do not try to be a robot or strive to be absolutely objective. This is impossible.

I embrace subjectivity but do so professionally. By this I mean that I take into account how a group responded to one or more lessons, what strategies I used with them, what content we uncovered together, etc.

We might have a menu to follow, but each dish is a bit different from another. I acknowledge and respect that by seeing how it was prepared (focusing on the process), not what it looks like (focusing on the product).
 

Strive for timeliness
One thing that makes feedback effective is timeliness. Wait too long to provide it and all effort it lost because learners have forgotten what they wrote.

The assignments I grade and provide feedback on are submitted online. After the submission deadline, I process assignments in the order they were submitted. This means that the first person to submit gets feedback first.

I could resort to an administratively convenient alphabetical order, but this is not fair to students who might have Z surnames but A response times.

End note: I prepared much of this reflection after processing a day’s quota of assignments. My mind was still buzzing, so I put my energy into sharing some ideas.

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