Another dot in the blogosphere?

Free prescription on reading critically

Posted on: April 29, 2017

Caution by dstrelau, on Flickr
Caution” (CC BY 2.0) by dstrelau

 
Last week I read this blog entry, Give a kid a computer…what does it do to her social life? It summarised a research paper that claimed to study how computers influenced social development and participation in school.

The paper might seem like a good read, until you realise its limitations. The blogger pointed these out:

A few caveats of these conclusions should be borne in mind. First, the study only lasted for one school year. Second, having a smart phone, with the constant access it affords, may yield different results. Third, children were given a computer, but not Internet access. Some kids had it anyway, but the more profound effects may come from online access.

The single year study is quite a feat even though a longer longitudinal study would have been better. The researchers were probably limited by schooling policies and processes like access to students and how students are grouped.

I am more critical of the other study design flaws.

My first response was: Computers only, really?

Phones are the tools, instruments, and platforms of choice among students. You can take away their computers, but you can only remove their phones from their cold dead hands. If you wanted to study the impact of a technology set that was key to social development and school participation, you should focus on the influence of the phone.

My second response was: Not consider Internet access, really?

That is like studying the impact of cars on air quality or travel stress by limiting the cars to a thimble of fuel. Much of what we do with computers and phones today requires being online. You can focus on what happens offline with these devices, but this is such a limited view. This is like saying you observe what happens in one minute out of every hour and claim to know what happens all day.

There might be a need to study the impact of, say a 1:1 programme, but this would likely happen in the larger context of Internet-enabled phone use. It does not make sense to silo study the impact of non-Internet computer use.

My third response on reading the abstract was: Self-reporting via surveys, really?

There is nothing wrong with surveying itself, particularly if the surveys were well-designed and valid. However, self-reporting is notoriously unreliable because participant memories are subject to time, contextual interpretation, emotion, and other confounding factors.

Given that the study was quasi-experimental, where were the other data collection methods to triangulate the findings? These methods include, but are not limited to, observations, interviews, focus groups, document analysis, video analysis, etc.

While my critique might sound harsh, this is the norm of academic review. If a study is to inform theory or practice, is must be rigorous enough stand up to logical and impartial critique.

There is no perfect study and on-the-ground situations can be difficult. But if the researchers do not manage the circumstances and design with better methods, then their readers should read critically with informed lenses. If the latter do not have them, this doctor offers this free prescription.

1 Response to "Free prescription on reading critically"

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

http://edublogawards.com/files/2012/11/finalistlifetime-1lds82x.png
http://edublogawards.com/2010awards/best-elearning-corporate-education-edublog-2010/

Click to see all the nominees!

QR code


Get a mobile QR code app to figure out what this means!

My tweets

Archives

Usage policy

%d bloggers like this: