Another dot in the blogosphere?

PokémonGo microcosm and personal learning

Posted on: October 26, 2016

There are very few things that bring me to Facebook (FB). One of those things is Pokémon Go (PoGo).

There is a local FB group where PoGo gamers share their thoughts and conquests. The group is one of several resources I visit to learn how to play the game better.

I found that group to be a microcosm of the larger gaming world. In practically any online discussion of games, you might find:

  • Sharing: Of new articles, opinions, photos, videos, and other artefacts of the game.
  • The asking of questions: People who need help ask the community for tips, advice, and solutions to problems.
  • The answering of questions: People respond to those questions and some replies are more helpful than others. In the case of Pokémon Go, a few curate lists and markup maps of spawn nests.
  • The asking of questions without reading first: There will always be some who do not bother to find out the history of the group or to scroll down and read what was shared in the feed moments earlier.
  • Curt answers: Someone will invariably tell off those that do not do their legwork or homework.
  • Negativity: Examples might include some form of complaining, trolling, or insulting.
  • Self-policing: If there is a moderator, he or she might have stern words with offenders or ban them from the group. Moderators of groups in FB and Google+ might also leave the group to police itself.

Such a microcosm is self-supporting and self-sustaining. Membership is loose, but roles might eventually develop among those that stay.

For me, this is a perfect example of personal learning, not the artificial effort to personalise or tailor “learning” that vendors push.

The current offerings and rhetoric on “personalised learning” are often more about differentiated instruction than about learning. This is a closed and expensive affair that is tied to LMS, learner analytics, and anything else that can be packaged to make money. Pedagogy is removed as much as possible in favour of automatic and rudimentary algorithms.

In the PoGo group, the platform open and free, and the participants self-organise around a common passion. They teach and learn from one another as co-learners. Involvement is personal as is the learning. While this approach does not suit every context and circumstance, it can account for a sizeable portion. So why turn to personalised learning solutions when personal learning can happen more organically?

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